December 28, 2012 in Sports

Health concerns force Jones to quit basketball

Eric Olson Associated Press
 

Jones
(Full-size photo)

OMAHA, Neb. – As hard as it is for Creighton’s Josh Jones to give up basketball, he says it’s not worth risking his life to keep playing.

Doctors advised Jones to stop playing after he underwent a procedure Dec. 18 to locate and correct an atrial flutter. He faces more procedures to treat the heart condition that caused him to faint before a game three weeks ago.

He said he wanted to let their words soak in a few days before he made his announcement this week.

“My life is more important,” he said Thursday as teammates practiced behind him at the Vinardi Athletic Center. “The game has gotten me this far. I’m the same person with or without it. But right now, and maybe forever, I’m just stepping away from the game.”

Coach Greg McDermott said he sensed after he visited with Jones two weeks ago that it was doubtful Jones would return.

Jones had an initial health scare in 2007, when he needed an infected heart valve replaced. Doctors said the first procedure revealed additional concerns with Jones’ heart. Jones said he’ll undergo a second procedure in January to diagnose the other problems, and more treatment probably will follow.

He said it would have been impossible for him to play again this season. The fifth-year senior is scheduled to graduate in May with a degree in public relations.

Jones’ situation has prompted an outpouring of support from the community. Though he started only 14 of his 108 career games, he’s one of the Bluejays’ most popular players.

He’s an Omaha native who led Central High School, a few blocks from the Creighton campus, to three consecutive state championships.

“I’ve got aspirations to do other things,” Jones said. “I’m going to try to put my degree to use. I was going to do all these other things regardless, whenever my athletic career was going to end. Now it’s time to start pursuing them early.”

Jones said walking has been his most strenuous activity since he passed out during warm-ups before the Dec. 6 game at Nebraska. He admitted to still picking up a basketball and dribbling it when he’s hanging out at his family’s home near campus.

“I want to tell everybody I’m fine – I’m normal – I’m just not able to do high-intense things to put my heart rate at an unsafe rate that can put me down, make me pass out again or potentially cause death,” he said.

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