June 10, 2012 in Nation/World

San Diego, San Jose lead way on public pension cuts

Elliot Spagat Associated Press
 
By the numbers

$43 million: San Diego’s pension payments in 1999

$231.2 million: San Diego’s pension payments this year

$73 million: San Jose’s pension payments in 2001

$245 million: San Jose’s pension payments this year

SAN DIEGO – For years, companies have been chipping away at workers’ pensions. Now, two California cities may help pave the way for governments to follow suit.

Voters in San Diego and San Jose, the nation’s eighth- and 10th-largest cities, overwhelmingly approved ballot measures last week to roll back municipal retirement benefits – and not just for future hires but for current employees.

From coast to coast, the pensions of current public employees have long been generally considered untouchable. But now, some politicians are saying those obligations are trumped by the need to provide for the public’s health and safety.

The two California cases could put that argument to the test in a legal battle that could resonate in cash-strapped state capitals and city halls across the country.

Lawsuits have already been filed in both cities.

“Other states are going to have to pay attention,” said Amy Monahan, a law professor at the University of Minnesota.

The court battles are playing out as lawmakers across the U.S. grapple with ballooning pension obligations that increasingly threaten schools, police, health clinics and other basic services.

State and local governments may have $3 trillion in unfunded pension liabilities, and seven states and six large cities will be unable to cover their obligations beyond 2020, Northwestern University finance professor Joshua Rauh estimated last year.

In San Jose, current employees face salary cuts of up to 16 percent to fund the city’s pension plan. If they choose, they can instead accept a lower benefit and see the current retirement age of 55 raised to 57 for police officers and firefighters, and to 62 for other employees.

The voter-approved measure in San Diego imposes a six-year freeze on the pay levels used to determine pension benefits for current employees, a move that is expected to save nearly $1 billion over 30 years. Public employee unions have sued to block the measure, saying City Hall failed to negotiate the ballot’s wording as required by state law.

Legal experts expect the cities to argue that their obligations to provide basic services such as police protection and garbage removal override promises made to employees.

In San Diego, the city’s payments to its retirement fund soared from $43 million in 1999 to $231.2 million this year, equal to 20 percent of the operating budget. At the same time, the 1.3 million residents saw roads deteriorate and libraries cut hours. For a while, fire stations had to share engines and trucks.

San Jose’s pension payments jumped from $73 million in 2001 to $245 million this year, or 27 percent of its operating budget. Four libraries and a police station that were built over the past decade have never opened because the city cannot afford to operate them. The city of 960,000 cut its workforce 27 percent over the past 10 years.

© Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


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