March 17, 2012 in Business

EARLY BIRDS

Fans, entrepreneurs line up for newest iPad
Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

Hisanori Kogure, left, and Ryota Musha show off iPad tablet computers they purchased in Tokyo on Friday.
(Full-size photo)(All photos)

MADISON, Wis. – Apple’s latest iPad drew the customary lines of die-hard fans looking to be first and entrepreneurs looking to make a quick profit.

Many buyers lined up for hours, and in some cases overnight, as the tablet computer went on sale in the U.S. and nine other countries. They did so even though Apple started accepting online orders a week ago.

The new model comes with a faster processor, a much sharper screen and an improved camera, though the changes aren’t as big as the upgrade from the original model to the iPad 2.

As with the previous models, prices start at $499 in the U.S.

“I don’t think it’s worth the price, but I guess I’m a victim of society,” Athena May, 21, said in Paris.

Dan Krolikowski, 34, was first in line at a Madison, Wis., mall. He arrived 14 hours before the store’s opening and was buying an extra one to sell on the “gray market.”

“Last year I sold one on eBay and made over $500 in profit,” Krolikowski said, leaning back in a reclining lawn chair he brought. “I’m hoping to do that again this year.”

Those who ordered iPads online started getting them delivered Friday. However, Apple now says there’s a two- to three-week shipping delay for online orders. There’s also demand in countries where the new iPad isn’t available yet.

At the flagship Apple Store on New York’s Fifth Avenue, the composition of the line, and the way many customers were paying for two iPads each with wads of cash, suggested that many of the tablets were destined to be resold abroad.

About 450 people lined up outside Apple’s Ginza store in downtown Tokyo. Some had spent the night sleeping outside the store.

Many said they lined up for the atmosphere, rather than ordering online.

“Sure, it’s a marketing ploy, but I still love the experience,” said Pam Johnson, 58, a Portage, Wis., writer who traveled about an hour to the Madison store. “You have great conversations. You learn a lot. You don’t get that when you just sit at home and wait for it to be delivered to your doorstep.”

© Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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