May 15, 2012 in Nation/World

R.I. expands rights for gay couples

State will recognize out-of-state unions
Erika Niedowski Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

Andy Schmidt and his daughter Nora attend a rally supporting civil unions Monday at the state Capitol in Denver.
(Full-size photo)

Colorado Republicans reject civil unions bill

 A last-ditch effort by Colorado’s governor to give gay couples in the state rights similar to married couples failed Monday after Republicans rejected the proposal during a special legislative session.

 Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper had said the special session was needed to address a “fundamental question of fairness and civil rights.”

 The bill’s demise was expected by Democrats, who have begun using the issue as a rallying cry to topple Republicans in the November elections.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. – Rhode Island’s governor on Monday declared that the state will recognize same-sex marriages performed elsewhere, giving gay couples the same rights as heterosexual ones when it comes to health insurance and a slew of other benefits.

The order signed by Gov. Lincoln Chafee in a Statehouse ceremony directs state agencies to recognize marriages performed out of state as legal and treat same-sex married couples the same as heterosexual ones.

Some gay couples married outside Rhode Island – where civil unions are allowed, but gay marriage is illegal – have not been afforded certain rights because state law is not clear on the subject.

In 2007, then-Attorney General Patrick Lynch issued an opinion in favor of recognizing out-of-state same-sex marriages, but it was nonbinding. Chafee said his signing of the executive order is “following through” on that opinion.

The executive order is expected to have many real-world implications. Same-sex spouses of state employees and anyone covered by an insurance company regulated in Rhode Island will be entitled to health and life insurance benefits, gay rights advocates say.

Both same-sex partners will be able to list their names as parents on a child’s birth certificate, and same-sex couples will be entitled to sales tax exemptions on the transfer of property including vehicles.

Speaking to an audience that included many gay married couples who cheered loudly when Chafee entered the room, Martha Holt Castle described the disappointment that she and her wife, Patricia, felt when they weren’t able to list both their names on their son’s birth certificate when Martha gave birth to him in 2010. They were married in neighboring Massachusetts.

“For our next child, we won’t have to go through the same kind of turmoil,” she said.

A spokesman for the state chapter of the National Organization for Marriage, which opposes same-sex marriage, said in a statement that his group is deeply concerned about Chafee’s action.

“To issue an executive order recognizing same-sex marriage flies in the face of the clearly expressed actions of the legislature and the people,” said Christopher C. Plante, regional coordinator for the group.

Opposition from some people last year prompted the Legislature to abandon a bill that would have legalized gay marriage and approve civil unions instead.

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