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Texas judge to rule on disruptive JetBlue pilot

FILE - In this April 2, 2012, file photo JetBlue pilot Clayton Frederick Osbon, right, is escorted to a waiting vehicle by FBI agents as he is released from The Pavilion at Northwest Texas Hospital, in Amarillo, Texas. A federal judge is expected to rule on whether a JetBlue Airways pilot who disrupted a flight by running through the plane and yelling about terrorists can go free. Osbon was charged with interference with a flight crew for his behavior on the March 27 flight from New York to Las Vegas. He was found not guilty by reason of insanity. On Friday Nov. 9, 2012, a judge in Amarillo will decide if Osbon should be committed to a mental health facility or set free. (Michael Schumacher / Amarillo Globe-news)
FILE - In this April 2, 2012, file photo JetBlue pilot Clayton Frederick Osbon, right, is escorted to a waiting vehicle by FBI agents as he is released from The Pavilion at Northwest Texas Hospital, in Amarillo, Texas. A federal judge is expected to rule on whether a JetBlue Airways pilot who disrupted a flight by running through the plane and yelling about terrorists can go free. Osbon was charged with interference with a flight crew for his behavior on the March 27 flight from New York to Las Vegas. He was found not guilty by reason of insanity. On Friday Nov. 9, 2012, a judge in Amarillo will decide if Osbon should be committed to a mental health facility or set free. (Michael Schumacher / Amarillo Globe-news)

AMARILLO, Texas (AP) — A federal judge is expected to rule on whether a JetBlue Airways pilot who disrupted a flight by running through the plane and yelling about terrorists can go free.

Clayton Osbon was charged with interference with a flight crew for his behavior on the March 27 flight from New York to Las Vegas. He was found not guilty by reason of insanity.

On Friday, a judge in Amarillo will decide if Osbon should be committed to a mental health facility or set free.

A neuropsychologist testified in July that Osbon had a “brief psychotic disorder” brought on by lack of sleep. In August, Osbon had another psychotic episode while in prison for a court-ordered mental evaluation.

U.S. District Judge Mary Lou Robinson then extended Osbon’s evaluation.



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