Nation/World

Superstorm priorities for some include saving pets

FILE - In this Oct., 28, 2012, file photo, Bill Ryan, of Inwood, N.Y., comforts his cat Amy before the arrival of Superstorm Sandy as he leaves his pet at shelter at Mitchell Park's Field House, run by the Nassau County Office of Emergency Management and Pet Safe Coalition in Uniondale, N.Y. Pet owners could drop of their pets at the shelter and afterwards seek shelter for themselves. (Kathy Kmonicek / Fr170189 Ap)
FILE - In this Oct., 28, 2012, file photo, Bill Ryan, of Inwood, N.Y., comforts his cat Amy before the arrival of Superstorm Sandy as he leaves his pet at shelter at Mitchell Park's Field House, run by the Nassau County Office of Emergency Management and Pet Safe Coalition in Uniondale, N.Y. Pet owners could drop of their pets at the shelter and afterwards seek shelter for themselves. (Kathy Kmonicek / Fr170189 Ap)

NEW YORK (AP) — Superstorm Sandy roared into the lives of millions of people who’re now scrambling to recover — while also saving their pets.

In New York City and Long Island, the ASPCA has rescued more than 300 animals and treated or provided supplies to about 13,000.

Search-and-rescue teams led by Animal Care & Control of NYC have been responding to calls about pets in distress.

Celebrity chef Rachael Ray is donating $500,000 to the ASPCA to help pets and their struggling families. The money will be used to lease a New York building for emergency boarding.

Niki Dawson is director of disaster services for the Humane Society of the United States. She says there’s such a strong bond between people and pets that people will risk their lives to save them.



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