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October 10, 2012
Steve Karnowski photo

In a Sept. 26, 2012 photo an opponents of wolf hunting protests outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis. Federal officials removed Great Lakes wolves from the endangered species list in January. Given free rein to manage the species, Wisconsin and Minnesota lawmakers pushed aside the concerns of some environmentalists and established their first seasons allowing hunters to bait, shoot and trap wolves.

Steve Karnowski photo

FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2012 file photo, Miles Kuschel checks his herd, which has lost several calves to wolves, on his ranch near Sebeka, Minn. Farmers have long complained about wolves wreaking havoc on their livestock and have been clamoring for states to allow hunting. Now, with government removal of Great Lakes wolves from the endangered species list in January, hunters in Wisconsin and Minnesota are preparing for the states� first organized wolf hunts.

Steve Karnowski photo

FILE - This Jan. 19, 2012, file photo shows wolf tracks in the snow at the Kuschel family�Rocking K Ranch near Sebeka, Minn., that has lost several calves to wolves. Just to the left of the wolf tracks are the footprints of a coyote that followed along later. Federal officials removed Great Lakes wolves from the endangered species list in January. Given free rein to manage the species, Wisconsin and Minnesota lawmakers pushed aside the concerns of some environmentalists and established their first seasons. Wisconsin�s wolf season is set to open Oct. 15. Minnesota�s starts Nov. 3.