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October 14, 2012
Ross Franklin photo

Felix Baumgartner, third from left, of Austria, gets a hug from Mission Control technical project director Art Thompson, as television crews and pool photographers converge on the scene, after Baumgartner successfully jumped from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth’s surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M.

Ross Franklin photo

Art Thompson, right, Mission Control technical project director, hugs Ava Baumgartner, second from right, as Lisa Fuerst, second from left, hugs a family friend, after Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, successfully jumped from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth’s surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M.

Ross Franklin photo

Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, gestures prior to speaking with the media after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth’s surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M.

Ross Franklin photo

As project team members cheer on Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, he leaps out of the space capsule, as seen on television, at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth’s surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth.

Ross Franklin photo

Felix Baumgartner, right, of Austria, shares a laugh with Col. Joe Kittinger, USAF retired, after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth’s surface, beating Kittinger’s old record of 102,799 ft., Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M.

Ross Franklin photo

Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, gives a thumbs up to Mission Control staff, family, and friends after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth’s surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M.

Ross Franklin photo

Felix Baumgartner, middle, of Austria, walks with his girlfriend Nici Oetl, facing at left, after Baumgartner successfully jumped from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth’s surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M.

Red Bull Stratos photo

This image taken from a video monitor, provided by Red Bull Stratos, shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria before he jumps out of the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. In a giant leap from more than 24 miles up, Baumgartner shattered the sound barrier Sunday while making the highest jump ever � a tumbling, death-defying plunge from a balloon to a safe landing in the New Mexico desert.

Red Bull Stratos photo

This image made from video, provided by Red Bull Stratos shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria as he jumps out of the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. In a giant leap from more than 24 miles up, Baumgartner shattered the sound barrier Sunday while making the highest jump ever � a tumbling, death-defying plunge from a balloon to a safe landing in the New Mexico desert.

Balazs Gardi photo

In this photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria celebrates after successfully completing the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M., Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012.�Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth.