October 16, 2012 in Features

The Slice: It must’ve been a call from a parallel universe

By The Spokesman-Review
 

It’s one thing to have people doubt your word, but this is ridiculous.

“For a while, I kept getting wrong numbers for a gal who had the same first name as I do,” wrote Denise Chamberlain. “I almost got into arguments with one man who kept insisting that I was lying about who I was.”

Amazing. Has it ever occurred to you to challenge the veracity of someone telling you that you have dialed the wrong number?

Who thinks like that? I have theories.

Guys who have a history of being named in restraining orders.

People who believe that if they are assertive enough they can bend reality to their will.

Someone trying to collect a debt.

Individuals who assume everyone else is lying because they themselves seldom tell the truth.

Today’s family phrase: Teresa Lukens told about how a visiting 4-year-old wanted to watch a certain cable TV show and this little girl wondered if it might be available “On the man.”

Years later, that’s still how those in the Lukens household refer to “On Demand.”

Nightmare scenario: “Our granddaughters spent the night with us last night and the little 4-year-old woke up crying during the night,” Lori Goldade wrote last week. “I asked what was wrong and she replied that she had a bad dream. When I asked her what she was dreaming about she said, ‘We were going to Deer Park in Daddy’s truck and he got mad at me.’ ”

Goldade asked the child why her father had been angry.

“He didn’t want me driving his truck,” she answered.

Re: women and fainting: “I sort of wonder if fainting ever was a prevalent concern for women at any time in history, or merely a cliché that costumed dramas liked to have their heroines perform,” wrote Nicole Bower.

Maybe. Although foundation garments that restricted breathing and blood flow probably weren’t conducive to maintaining consciousness. But speaking of clichés and women in dramas, what are some of your favorites?

How about when, in old TV Westerns, women in tense situations that required running could be counted on to promptly twist an ankle and fall?

Today’s Slice question: What percentage of Spokane-area residents are apt to be described as having “skipped town” if they took a trip?

Write The Slice at P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210; call (509) 459-5470; email pault@spokesman.com. Twitter can be a good tool if you think of it as …


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