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October 18, 2012
A.m.ahad A.m.ahad photo

Bangladeshi Quazi Ahsanullah displays a photograph of his son Quazi Mohammad Rezwanul Ahsan Nafis as he weeps in his home in the Jatrabari neighborhood in north Dhaka, Bangladesh, Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012. The FBI arrested 21-year-old Nafis on Wednesday after he tried to detonate a fake 1,000-pound (454-kilogram) car bomb, according to a criminal complaint. His family said Thursday that Nafis was incapable of such actions.

A.m.ahad A.m.ahad photo

Bangladeshi Quazi Ahsanullah, father of Quazi Mohammad Rezwanul Ahsan Nafis, sits in his home in the Jatrabari neighborhood in north Dhaka, Bangladesh, Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012. The FBI arrested 21-year-old Nafis on Wednesday after he tried to detonate a fake 1,000-pound (454-kilogram) car bomb, according to a criminal complaint. His family said Thursday that Nafis was incapable of such actions.

A.m.ahad A.m.ahad photo

Grandmother, left, and aunt of Bangladeshi Quazi Mohammad Rezwanul Ahsan Nafis weep in his home in the Jatrabari neighborhood in north Dhaka, Bangladesh, Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012. The FBI arrested 21-year-old Nafis on Wednesday after he tried to detonate a fake 1,000-pound (454-kilogram) car bomb, according to a criminal complaint. His family said Thursday that Nafis was incapable of such actions.

A.m.ahad A.m.ahad photo

Bangladeshi Quazi Ahsanullah, father of Quazi Mohammad Rezwanul Ahsan Nafis, weeps in his home in the Jatrabari neighborhood in north Dhaka, Bangladesh, Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012. The FBI arrested 21-year-old Nafis on Wednesday after he tried to detonate a fake 1,000-pound (454-kilogram) car bomb, according to a criminal complaint. His family said Thursday that Nafis was incapable of such actions.

Richard Drew photo

A man with two children passes the New York Stock Exchange, Thursday morning, Oct. 18, 2012. A Bangladeshi man, 21-year-old Quazi Mohammad Rezwanul Ahsan Nafis, snared in an FBI terror sting, considered targeting a high-ranking government official and the New York Stock Exchange before authorities say he raised the bar further by picking one of New York City’s most fortified sites: The Federal Reserve.