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September 6, 2012
Nati Harnik photo

In this photo from Sept. 4, 2012, Thom Reeves, owner of the Isis movie theatre, treads a roll of 35 mm film in the projection room in Crete, Neb. . The Isis Theatre hasn�t changed much since it opened 86 years ago, but as the movie industry phases out the traditional 35 mm film reels in favor of digital media, the Isis� owner must come up with $85,000 to buy new projection equipment, computers, a sound system and even a different screen. It is a huge financial burden for the small theatre.

Nati Harnik photo

In this photo from Sept. 4, 2012, Thom Reeves, owner of the Isis theatre, holds a photo showing the building’s facade in 1932 during the showing of the movie “The Kid from Spain”, starring Eddie Cantor, in Crete, Neb. The Isis Theatre hasn�t changed much since it opened 86 years ago, but as the movie industry phases out the traditional 35 mm film reels in favor of digital media, the Isis� owner must come up with $85,000 to buy new projection equipment, computers, a sound system and even a different screen. It is a huge financial burden for the small theatre.

Nati Harnik photo

In this photo from Sept. 4, 2012, Thom Reeves, owner of the Isis movie theatre, carries a heavy roll of 35 mm film in the projection room in Crete, Neb. The Isis Theatre hasn�t changed much since it opened 86 years ago, but as the movie industry phases out the traditional 35 mm film reels in favor of digital media, the Isis� owner must come up with $85,000 to buy new projection equipment, computers, a sound system and even a different screen. It is a huge financial burden for the small theatre.

Nati Harnik photo

This photo from Sept. 4, 2012 shows the Isis movie theatre building in Crete, Neb., far right. The Isis Theatre hasn�t changed much since it opened 86 years ago, but as the movie industry phases out the traditional 35 mm film reels in favor of digital media, the Isis� owner must come up with $85,000 to buy new projection equipment, computers, a sound system and even a different screen. It is a huge financial burden for the small theatre.

Nati Harnik photo

In this photo from Sept. 4, 2012, a lone spectator enters the Isis movie theatre for the 6:30 showing of a movie, in Crete, Neb. The Isis Theatre hasn�t changed much since it opened 86 years ago, but as the movie industry phases out the traditional 35 mm film reels in favor of digital media, the Isis� owner must come up with $85,000 to buy new projection equipment, computers, a sound system and even a different screen. It is a huge financial burden for the small theatre.