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September 21, 2012
Matthew Brown photo

This April 23, 2012 photo shows Ellen Pfister inspecting the embankment of a coal mine access road that passes through her ranch in the Bull Mountains south of Roundup, Mont. Rising U.S. coal exports that the industry hopes can offset flagging domestic demand are reviving worries among some Montana ranchers that their way of life could be sacrificed to feed Asian energy demands. Near the town of Roundup, the once-shuttered Bull Mountain mine could produce more than 9 million tons of coal this year, more than half headed overseas.

Matthew Brown photo

This April 23, 2012 photo shows Ellen Pfister looking over a map depicting the Bull Mountain Mine that reaches beneath her ranch as husband Don Golder looks on from their house south of Roundup, Mont. Rising U.S. coal exports that the industry hopes can offset flagging domestic demand are reviving worries among some Montana ranchers that their way of life could be sacrificed to feed Asian energy demands. Near the town of Roundup, the once-shuttered Bull Mountain mine could produce more than 9 million tons of coal this year, more than half headed overseas.