September 30, 2012 in City

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

By The Spokesman-Review
 

From our archives, 100 years ago

Spokane’s “mammoth” Interstate Fair opened with a big downtown parade and a flyover by a “birdman” – daredevil aviator Walter Edwards.

The event schedule included a baby contest, motorcycle races, an appearance by the Bonomar “troupe of Arabs,” a sheepdog exhibition, band concerts, fireworks and a midway.

The fair’s spectacular gala, to be presented each night, was titled “The Conquest of Mexico.”

“Dozens of make-believe Mexicans, Spaniards and Indians in their many-colored costumes” marched and danced under a “new mountain range which had sprung up overnight in the center of the racetrack.”

From the saloon beat: Jack Crowley, a member of the Carpenters Union and a married man, bought drinks for the house at the Headlight Bar in downtown Spokane.

Then he calmly announced that he had “taken his last drink.” 

He proved true to his word. His body was found the next day in Hangman Creek, dead by suicide.

Also on this date

(From the Associated Press)

1846: Boston dentist William Morton used ether as an anesthetic for the first time as he extracted an ulcerated tooth from merchant Eben Frost. … 1949: The Berlin Airlift came to an end. … 1982: The situation comedy “Cheers” premiered on NBC-TV.

Get stories like this in a free daily email


Please keep it civil. Don't post comments that are obscene, defamatory, threatening, off-topic, an infringement of copyright or an invasion of privacy. Read our forum standards and community guidelines.

You must be logged in to post comments. Please log in here or click the comment box below for options.

comments powered by Disqus