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September 30, 2012
Brennan Linsley photo

FILE- In this file photograph made on July 29, 2010, upon landing after a helicopter rescue mission, Tech. Sgt. Jeff Hedglin, right, an Air Force Pararescueman, or PJ, drapes an American flag over the remains of the first of two U.S. soldiers killed minutes earlier in an IED attack, assisted by fellow PJs, Senior Airman Robert Dieguez, center, and 1st Lt. Matthew Carlisle, in Kandahar province, southern Afghanistan. U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan have surpassed 2,000, a grim reminder that a war which began nearly 11 years ago shows no signs of slowing down despite an American decision to begin the withdrawal of most of its combat forces.

Julie Jacobson photo

FILE - In this May 8, 2010 file photo, a tattoo on the back of U.S. Army Sgt. James Wilkes of Rochester, N.Y., is seen through his torn shirt after a foot patrol with 1st Platoon, Charlie Company, 2nd Battalion, 1st Infantry Regiment, of the 5th Styker Brigade, in Afghanistan’s Kandahar province. The full tattoo reads, “Sacrifice. Without fear there is no courage.” .U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan have surpassed 2,000, a grim reminder that a war which began nearly 11 years ago shows no signs of slowing down despite an American decision to begin the withdrawal of most of its combat forces.

Gurinder Osan photo

FILE - In this March 26, 2003 file photograph, U.S. Military personnel pray as they attend the memorial service for their their comerades in Kandahar, Afghanistan. .U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan have surpassed 2,000, a grim reminder that a war which began nearly 11 years ago shows no signs of slowing down despite an American decision to begin the withdrawal of most of its combat forces.

Musadeq Sadeq photo

FILE - In this Sept 11, 2008 file photograph, US soldiers attend a ceremony marking the 7th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, at the U.S Camp Phoenix in Kabul, Afghanistan. .U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan have surpassed 2,000, a grim reminder that a war which began nearly 11 years ago shows no signs of slowing down despite an American decision to begin the withdrawal of most of its combat forces.