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In brief: Climbers recover body from glacier

ANCHORAGE, Alaska – The body of a 9-year-old boy who disappeared while snowmobiling with his father has been recovered from a crevasse in an Alaska glacier.

Alaska State Troopers spokeswoman Megan Peters said by email that the body of Shjon Brown, of Fairbanks, was recovered at 12:40 a.m. Monday.

The boy was on a Saturday snowmobile outing with his father and others in the Hoodoo Mountains south of Delta Junction. As his father took a break on the side of a hill, Shjon drove around a small mound and did not reappear. His father traced the boy’s tracks and discovered that he had fallen through a moulin, a hole formed when water on the glacier’s surface melts ice to a crevasse below.

Climbers from the North American Outdoor Institute and an emergency room doctor reached the bottom of the crevasse an estimated 200 feet from the surface. A climber spotted the boy’s goggles and helmet and the partially visible snowmobile.

Climbers who descended into the hole late Sunday said they found Shjon’s body buried in 6 to 8 feet of snow underneath his snowmobile.

Soldier gets 16 years in espionage case

JOINT BASE ELMENDORF- RICHARDSON, Alaska – An Alaska-based military policeman will serve 16 years in prison and will be dishonorably discharged for selling military secrets to a Russian agent, who was an undercover FBI agent.

Spec. William Colton Millay of Owensboro, Ky., was sentenced Monday. A panel of eight military members recommended a 19-year sentence, but that was dropped to 16 years because of a pretrial agreement.

Military prosecutors painted Millay as a white supremacist who was fed up with the Army and the United States and was willing to sell secrets to an enemy agent, even if that would cost his fellow soldiers their lives.

Defense attorneys said Millay is emotionally stunted, was only seeking attention and is a candidate for rehabilitation.

Carnival says it will repay government

MIAMI – Carnival Corp. said Monday it will repay the U.S. government an unspecified amount for the costs to taxpayers of responses to disabling accidents on its Triumph and Splendor cruise ships, both of which left thousands of passengers stranded at sea for days.

The world’s largest cruise line company said the payments were being made voluntarily to the U.S. Treasury Department and that no government agency had requested reimbursement for either accident.

But Carnival had come under pressure from U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., who was highly critical last week of Carnival’s indirect responses to his inquiries about its willingness to pay.


 

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