April 20, 2013 in Nation/World

Midwest reels from days of heavy rain

Some states could see up to 12 feet above flood stage
Jim Salter And Jim Suhr Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

Taylor Township, Ind., volunteer firefighters rescue a man from his truck that was swept away in the water rushing over a bridge Friday morning.
(Full-size photo)

ST. LOUIS – Flood fighters from small Mississippi River hamlets to the suburbs of Chicago staged a feverish battle Friday to hold back raging rivers, after days of torrential rains soaked much of the Midwest.

Mississippi River communities in Iowa, Illinois and Missouri are expected to see significant flooding – some near-record levels – by the weekend, a sharp contrast to just two months ago when the river was approaching record lows. Michigan, Wisconsin and Indiana had flooding, too. All told, dozens of Midwestern rivers were well over their banks after rains that began Wednesday dumped up to 6 inches of new water on already saturated soil.

In Quincy, Ill., the normally slow to swell Mississippi River rose nearly 10 feet in 36 hours, National Weather Service hydrologist Mark Fuchs said.

“That’s pretty amazing,” Fuchs said of the fast-rising river. “It’s just been skyrocketing.”

Smaller rivers in Illinois seemed to be causing the worst of the flooding. In suburban Chicago, which got up to 7 inches of rain in a 24-hour period ending Thursday, record levels of water were moving through the Des Plaines River past heavily populated western suburbs and into the Illinois River to the south.

As many as 1,500 residents of the northern Illinois city of Marseilles were evacuated Thursday night when fears of a levee breach were heightened.

And in the central Illinois town of London Mills, the swollen Spoon River topped a levee, forcing about half of the 500 residents to evacuate. Police Chief Scott Keithley said some homes were half under water.

Mississippi River flooding wasn’t as pronounced as its water level varies greatly but is typically highest in the spring, so minor flooding is not uncommon. “Flood stage” is a somewhat arbitrary term that the National Weather Service says is the point when “water surface level begins to create a hazard to lives, property, or commerce.”

When river levels exceed flood stage by several feet, serious problems can occur. Just days ago, the Mississippi was well below flood stage. Forecasters now expect it to climb up to 12 feet above flood stage at some spots in Missouri and Illinois.

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