Nation/World

In brief: Seven more Penn State sex abuse claims settled

Harrisburg, Pa. – Seven more men, including Jerry Sandusky’s adopted son, have finalized deals with Penn State over claims of abuse by the school’s former assistant football coach, their lawyer says.

Settlements were reached by Matt Sandusky, the young man known as Victim 2 in court records and three other victims who testified last summer at Jerry Sandusky’s criminal trial, attorney Matt Casey said Friday.

Matt Sandusky had been expected to be a defense witness for his father until the trial, when he told investigators that he also had been abused by Jerry Sandusky. He has since petitioned for a legal name change for himself and his family.

Victim 2 has said he was the boy then-graduate assistant Mike McQueary testified he saw being attacked by Jerry Sandusky in a team shower in 2001. McQueary notified longtime coach Joe Paterno and school officials at the time, but police were never called, an omission that eventually led to Paterno’s firing.

Sandusky was convicted in June 2010 of 45 counts, found guilty of raping or fondling boys he had met through the acclaimed youth charity he founded, The Second Mile.

Casey did not disclose the terms of the settlements.

CT scan may help determine if beam is from La Salle’s ship

Gaylord, Mich. – Technicians at a northern Michigan hospital used a CT scan machine Saturday to take X-rays of a wooden beam that could be part of the Griffin, a ship commanded by the French explorer La Salle that has been missing for more than three centuries.

The procedure was the latest twist in a decades-old quest by diver and history buff Steve Libert to locate the vessel, which disappeared in 1679 after setting sail from an island near Lake Michigan’s Green Bay with a crew of six and a cargo of furs. A dive team retrieved the timber in June after discovering to their disappointment that it wasn’t attached to buried wreckage.

They hope the CT scan, which produced images of tree rings inside the beam, will help determine whether it was cut down around the time the Griffin was built.

Michigan’s state archaeologist, Dean Anderson, has said he isn’t convinced the beam is part of a ship and contends it could be a stake from a “pound net,” a type of fishing gear used in past centuries.



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