February 21, 2013 in Nation/World

Pentagon outlines likely cuts from looming budget impasse

Contractors face furloughs
Robert Burns Associated Press
 
Fairchild would feel effect

If a deal is not reached and mandatory federal budget cuts go into effect March 1, Pentagon officials say the effects would be felt throughout the Defense Department and in all locations.

At Fairchild Air Force Base, Col. Brian Newberry of the 92nd Refueling Wing reports that funding cuts could lead to more grounded flights and other travel reductions.

“Flying operations at Fairchild, not directly related to readiness, will be curtailed,” Newberry said in a statement last month.

Hiring practices could be affected as well. If Congress can’t reach a deal, civilian recruitment could be frozen and temporary employees fired, according to the Department of Defense. Base records show more than 1,100 civilians work at Fairchild.

– Correspondent Kip Hill

WASHINGTON – Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told Congress on Wednesday that if automatic government spending cuts kick in on March 1 he may have to shorten the workweek for the “vast majority” of the Defense Department’s 800,000 civilian workers.

They would lose one day of work per week, or 20 percent of their pay, for up to 22 weeks, probably starting in late April.

To dispel the notion that this is mainly a problem for the nation’s capital, the Pentagon’s budget chief, Robert Hale, told reporters that the economic impact would be felt nationwide. The biggest potential losses, in terms of total civilian payroll dollars, would be in Virginia, California, Maryland, Texas and Georgia, according to figures provided by the Pentagon.

Hale said the unpaid leaves for civilian workers would begin in late April and would save $4 billion to $5 billion if extended through the end of the budget year, Sept. 30. That is only a fraction of the $46 billion the Pentagon would have to cut this budget year unless a deficit-reduction deal is reached.

Panetta also said the across-the-board spending reductions would “put us on a path toward a hollow force,” meaning a military incapable of fulfilling all of its missions.

In a written message to employees, Panetta said that he notified members of Congress Wednesday that if the White House and Congress cannot strike a deficit reduction deal before March 1 to avoid the furloughs, all affected workers will get at least 30 days’ advance notice.

“In the event of sequestration we will do everything we can to be able to continue to perform our core mission of providing for the security of the United States, but there is no mistaking that the rigid nature of the cuts forced upon this department, and their scale, will result in a serious erosion of readiness across the force,” Panetta wrote.

Panetta was flying Wednesday to Brussels to attend a NATO defense ministers meeting. Spokesman George Little told reporters en route that Panetta would tell his counterparts that across-the-board budget cuts will hurt not only the U.S. military but also the ability of NATO to respond to crises.

Little said the Pentagon is also discussing the possibility of not being able to send military units on planned rotations to various places around the world. In anticipation of cuts, the Pentagon has already decided not to send one aircraft carrier back to the Persian Gulf, reducing the U.S. presence there to one carrier.

The Pentagon has begun discussing details of the furloughs with defense worker union officials.

President Barack Obama has exempted military personnel from furloughs.

Obama was continuing to pressure Republican lawmakers to avert the automatic cuts by supporting a Senate Democratic plan that would replace the immediate cuts with a mix of spending reductions and tax increases. He was conducting interviews with local television in eight markets: Boston, Charleston, S.C., Baltimore, Oklahoma City, Wichita, Kan., San Antonio, San Francisco, and Honolulu.

“I don’t know why it is in this town folks leave stuff to the last minute. You know, there’s no other profession, no other industry, where people wait until the 11th hour to solve these big problems,” Obama told WJZ, the CBS affiliate in Baltimore.

Panetta said the administration is still working with Congress to avoid automatic budget cuts by reaching agreement on a deficit reduction plan.

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