July 4, 2013 in Sports

Cavendish edges closer to legend’s mark

With stage win, now 10 behind Merckx’s record
John Leicester Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

Britain’s Marc Cavendish is one stage win away from tying Andre Leducq, the Frenchman who captured 25 stage wins, for third on the all-time list.
(Full-size photo)

MARSEILLE, France – Mark Cavendish will never be the greatest Tour de France rider, because he will never win the race five times like Eddy Merckx of Belgium and Frenchman Bernard Hinault. Still, the sprinter with thighs like thick hams could outdo both those legends – by winning more stages at cycling’s premier race.

By Cavendish’s warp-speed standards, his 24th stage win on Wednesday was a ride in the park. The teammates who led Cavendish to the finish, sucking him along in their wheels, building up his speed, were toiling like clockwork. Stamping on his pedals, head down, thighs pumping like pistons, Cavendish then whooshed off alone for the last 150 meters, leaving everyone else in his wake.

Cavendish was carrying so much momentum and this win in Marseille, France’s second-largest city, was so comfortable that he was able to sit up in the saddle and make a hand motion like cracking a whip as he crossed the line.

One more stage win will tie Cavendish with Andre Leducq, the Frenchman who got 25 stage wins in the 1920s and 30s, putting him third on the all-time list. Beyond Leducq is Hinault, who notched up 28 wins in the 1970s and ’80s. Merckx’s monument is 34, won from 1969 to 1975.

Cavendish says he isn’t fixated on Hinault or Merckx’s numbers.

“You have to show the Tour de France the respect it deserves,” he said.

But then Cavendish isn’t any other rider. Before this edition, he collected on average nearly five wins at every Tour since 2008. In 2009, he got six. He won the last four sprint finishes on the Champs-Elysees in Paris, where he is unbeaten since 2009. While Merckx’s record is still a way off, Hinault and most certainly Leducq look within Cavendish’s grasp.

“Obviously I aim to win multiple stages each year. But to set any goals, any number … it does one of two things: It sets you up to fail for something or it puts like a mark on what you want to achieve and it can kind of stop you trying to move forward,” he said.

Stage 6 today – 176.5 kilometers (110 miles) from Aix-en-Provence to Montpellier – should also suit Cavendish, because it is flat. With his short, muscular frame, he doesn’t like steep climbs.

Simon Gerrans of Australia will again wear the yellow jersey after keeping the race lead on Wednesday’s bumpy 228.5-kilometer (142-mile) trek from the beach resort of Cagnes-sur-Mer.

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