Local news

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago

The Albert Williams murder trial continued after a holiday recess. The jurors were taken on a field trip to the railroad viaduct where young Williams was beaten to death with a length of gas pipe.

Later, the jury also heard a witness, who lived near the site of the murder, recount that he was awoken by a scream that night and looked out his window to see two men running away.

However, he swore on the stand that the men were not Charles and Porter Fueston, on trial for the murder. He said he didn’t know who they were, but one was much taller than the other, so they couldn’t have been the Fuestons.

The prosecution tried to get the witness to admit that he really couldn’t see much of anything from his window, but the witness stuck to his story.

From the baseball beat: Here’s a colorful bit of sportswriting, 1913 style, recording a play in which a player named Million (nickname, “Ten” Million) hit a soft fly ball to short center: “Million was just rounding first when the ball dropped, but he continued to second and was out by 20 feet, tossing away a chance to get a run over the pan. Powell (the manager) yanked Million out of the game for the boneheaded work and went into center field himself.”



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