July 10, 2013 in Sports

All in a day’s work

Blood, bruises part of sprinter’s job in Tour
John Leicester Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

Marcel Kittel, right, crosses the line ahead of Andre Greipel, center, and Mark Cavendish to win Stage 10 of the Tour de France.
(Full-size photo)

Kittel doubles pleasure with win

Germany’s Marcel Kittel won Tuesday’s 10th stage of the Tour de France in a sprint finish in Saint-Malo, France, and Chris Froome stayed out of trouble to keep the leader’s yellow jersey. Kittel held off countryman Andre Greipel and Mark Cavendish in a dash to the line to win his second stage of the Tour.

The 122-mile flat route started from Saint-Gildas-Des-Bois in northwest France and finished in the walled port city of Saint-Malo, a tourist destination on the north coast of Brittany.

Froome was the Tour runner-up to British countryman Bradley Wiggins last year. He has a healthy lead over second-place Alejandro Valverde and two-time champion Alberto Contador and will look to extend it in today’s time trial.

SAINT-MALO, France – Hitting the asphalt at something like 60 kilometers per hour (40 mph) flayed off a patch of skin from Tom Veelers’ right thigh. Blood snaked down his leg from his sliced-up right knee. His white jersey was torn and soiled.

“Bruised and scratched from all sides,” the big Dutchman said when asked how he felt. “But … yeah, OK.”

In short, Stage 10 was another day at the office for the charging-bull sprinters of the Tour de France.

Chris Froome, the race leader, isn’t a sprinter. The Briton was just relieved to survive unscathed all the pushing and shoving on two wheels.

The “worst nightmare,” he said, for riders like him – lighter, less muscular and with eyes fixed on reaching the podium in Paris on July 21 – is to be felled by crashes like the one that floored Veelers on Tuesday in Saint-Malo. The fall came in the shadow of this Brittany port’s crenelated walls, with spectators crammed cheek by jowl to get a look.

“Every day you get through with the yellow jersey is a blessing,” Froome said. “So I’m happy just to tick that one off.”

Veelers’ job is to help launch his teammate, sprinter Marcel Kittel, in the final mad dash for the line. He did that just fine on Tuesday, because Kittel won – becoming the first rider at this 100th Tour to win two stages, having also won Stage 1.

As Kittel sprinted away, rival Mark Cavendish hared after the German. In doing so, Cavendish’s left arm barged into Veelers’ right arm. Because of the speed, the contact was enough to tip the Dutch rider over.

“Marcel went all the way left and Cavendish dived to the left, I think to try to follow Marcel,” Veelers explained after he picked himself up, climbed back on his bike and rode through the finish to his Argos-Shimano team bus, where a shoal of impatient, sharp-elbowed reporters waited.

“He touched my handlebars and knocked me over.”

Cavendish was adamant this wasn’t deliberate. The Briton with 24 Tour stage wins lost his temper with an Associated Press reporter who asked if he was at fault, grabbing his voice recorder.

“I touched with him. But the road’s bearing left. I know you’re trying to get all the ‘Oh, Mark Cavendish, a really bad sprint again.’ The road’s bearing left. Two hundred and fifty meters to go, the road bears left … I followed the road,” he said.

The race jury studied video of the incident but took no action, allowing Cavendish to keep his third place behind Kittel and stage runner-up Andre Greipel, another German who won the finishing sprint on Stage 6.

Kittel also gave Cavendish the benefit of the doubt.

“I cannot imagine that it was on purpose because it was a very hectic situation and it was just the last moment of the sprint,” he said. “Sometimes that is something which just happens.”

Having luxuriated Monday in their first rest day, riders were generally content Tuesday to race at a leisurely pace. The pack allowed five riders to race away and build up a lead – and then reeled them in as teams set up their sprinters to compete in the final dash.

Today, the focus shifts away from the sprinters and back to Froome and his rivals for overall victory.

Stage 11 – a time trial where the riders all race individually against the clock – could be one of the most visually spectacular of this Tour, where every day already has delivered a feast for the eyes.

The 33-kilometer (20.5-mile) course loops from the Normandy port of Avranches, with its memorial to U.S. Gen. George S. Patton, to the breathtaking Mont-Saint-Michel, a Gothic-style Benedictine abbey and walled village that towers skyward from an islet perched in a bay.

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