Business

Meat groups sue USDA over new labeling rules

A meat wrapper arranges meat in a cooler at a Seattle store in this file photo. New rules being fought by industry groups require labels for steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to detail where animals grown for meat were born, raised and slaughtered. (Associated Press)
A meat wrapper arranges meat in a cooler at a Seattle store in this file photo. New rules being fought by industry groups require labels for steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to detail where animals grown for meat were born, raised and slaughtered. (Associated Press)

DES MOINES, Iowa – Requiring meat labels to have more details about a product’s origins is too costly and serves no public health or safety benefit, industry groups said Tuesday in announcing a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Agriculture over new labeling rules.

The rules went into effect in May and require labels for steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to detail where animals grown for meat were born, raised and slaughtered. Previously, labels only required that countries of origin be noted, so a package might say, “Product of U.S. and Canada.” Now, the labels must specify “Born in Canada, raised and slaughtered in the United States.”

In addition, the USDA is prohibiting processors from mixing meat from animals born, raised or slaughtered in Mexico, Canada or other countries with meat from the U.S.

The American Meat Institute, a trade group for packers, processors and suppliers, and seven other groups said segregating the meat is not part of the law Congress passed and the USDA is overstepping its authority. They also claim the rule will be costly to implement and that it offers no food safety or public health benefit.

“Segregating and tracking animals according to the countries where production steps occurred and detailing that information on a label may be a bureaucrat’s paperwork fantasy, but the labels that result will serve only to confuse consumers, raise the prices they pay, and put some producers and meat and poultry companies out of business in the process,” Mark Dopp, an AMI executive, said in a statement.

The USDA says the country of original labeling, known as COOL, will help consumers make informed decisions about the food they buy.

Other advocates of the new rule say segregating meat will help if a food safety issue develops.

The meat industry groups that sued said in court documents that about 4 percent to 7 percent of beef and pork consumed in the U.S. comes from animals from other countries. In some parts of the U.S., including Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California, as much as half of the livestock used for meat could be imported.

Once in the supply chain, the meat becomes interchangeable with meat from U.S. animals, the groups said.

“In short, beef is beef, whether the cattle were born in Montana, Manitoba, or Mazatlan,” the lawsuit filed in federal court in Washington, D.C., said. “The same goes for hogs, chickens, and other livestock.”

Meat suppliers will be forced to segregate the animals along the entire supply chain “from the moment livestock are put in a pen on U.S. soil, throughout the production, storage, and distribution process, until the meat is placed on store shelves for sale.”

The USDA estimates the labeling change will cost somewhere between $53.1 million and $192.1 million to put in place. The National Grocers Association said it expected it to cost at least $100 million as companies buy new signs, labels and labeling machines.



There are three comments on this story »





Blogs

Dennis Held on the hold Spokane has on residents

Dennis titled this "The Theory of the Movement of Humans Through a Semi-Permeable Membrane, or, Osmosis: An Aquifer Indicted." "Because the Spokane Aquifer is directly beneath this whole valley, with ...


Zags rout Portland 92-66

Gonzaga hammered Portland 92-66 on Thursday as three Zags with Portland ties -- Kyle Wiltjer, Domantas Sabonis and Silas Melson -- combined for 51 points and 20 rebounds. My unedited ...


The works of Catholics nuns in Spokane

The nuns of Spokane have been Franciscans, Dominicans, Sisters of the Good Shepherd and the Holy Names and several other orders and their works and presence has been powerful in ...


Wild Card/Thursday — 2.11.16

During the last two days, I've made trips after work to my bank and Costco. At the bank, I'm greeted by tellers as I walk in who later ask, "How's ...





Sections


Profile

Contact the Spokesman

Main switchboard:
(509) 459-5000
Customer service:
(800) 338-8801
Newsroom:
(509) 459-5400
(800) 789-0029
Back to Spokesman Mobile