July 13, 2013 in Nation/World

In brief: Body of confessed strangler exhumed

From Wire Reports
 

Peabody, Mass. – Investigators have unearthed the remains of a man who once confessed to being the Boston Strangler in a bid to use forensic evidence to connect him to the death of a woman believed to be the serial killer’s last victim.

A bevy of law enforcement officials surrounded Albert DeSalvo’s grave on a grassy plot near a lake for Friday’s exhumation.

DeSalvo admitting killing Mary Sullivan and 10 other women in the Boston area from 1962 to 1964 in a series of slayings that became known as the Boston Strangler case. But he recanted in 1973 before dying in prison, where he was serving a life sentence for other crimes.

Authorities said Friday that they would take DeSalvo’s remains from Peabody to the medical examiner’s office in nearby Boston, where they’d take tissue or bone samples for DNA testing.

Saudi princess released on bail

Santa Ana, Calif. – A Saudi princess charged with human trafficking was freed after her country’s consulate posted her $5 million bail, but authorities imposed strict travel requirements and GPS tracking to keep her in Southern California.

Meshael Alayban, 42, was arrested Wednesday after a Kenyan woman who worked for her as a maid alleged she was held against her will and forced to toil long hours for meager pay.

Alayban, who prosecutors said is one of the six wives of Saudi Prince Abdulrahman bin Nasser bin Abdulaziz al Saud, is forbidden to have contact with the alleged victim, cannot leave Orange County without permission from the court and turned over her passport.

Court: Attractive worker’s firing legal

Iowa City, Iowa – A dentist acted legally when he fired an assistant because he had grown too attracted to her and worried he would try to start an extramarital affair, the Iowa Supreme Court reaffirmed Friday in its second crack at the controversial case.

Coming to the same outcome as it did in December, but clarifying its rationale, the court found that bosses can fire employees that they and their spouses see as threats to their marriages. The court said such firings do not count as sex discrimination because they’re motivated by feelings, not gender.

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