Nation/World

Colorado wildfire leaves two dead

Blackened areas define the path of a wildfire that destroyed some homes and left others untouched Thursday in the Black Forest area near Colorado Springs, Colo. (Associated Press)
Blackened areas define the path of a wildfire that destroyed some homes and left others untouched Thursday in the Black Forest area near Colorado Springs, Colo. (Associated Press)

State’s most destructive blaze claims at least 360 homes

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – A voracious wildfire driven in all directions by shifting winds has killed two people and destroyed at least 360 homes – a number that was likely to climb as the most destructive blaze in Colorado history burned for a third day through miles of tinder-dry woods, a sheriff said Thursday.

The destruction northeast of Colorado Springs has surpassed last June’s Waldo Canyon fire, which burned 347 homes, killed two people and caused $353 million in insurance claims just 15 miles to the southwest. The heavy losses were blamed in part on explosive population growth in areas with historically high fire risk.

“I never in my wildest dreams imagined we’d be dealing a year later with a very similar circumstance,” said El Paso County Sheriff Terry Maketa, who drew audible gasps as he announced the number of homes lost to the blaze in Black Forest. The fire was 5 percent contained.

Maketa said one person who was reported missing Wednesday was found safe, but crews on Thursday found the remains of two other people who appeared to be trying to flee. The victims were found in a garage in Black Forest. “The car doors were open as if they were loading or grabbing last-minute things,” Maketa said.

Earlier in the day, residents were ordered to leave 1,000 homes in Colorado Springs. Thursday’s evacuation was the first within the city limits. About 38,000 other people living across roughly 70 square miles were already under orders to get out.

Colorado’s second-largest city, with a population of 430,000, also asked residents of 2,000 more homes to be ready to evacuate. The streets became gridlocked with hundreds of cars while emergency vehicles raced by on shoulders.

Gene Schwarz, 72, said he had never fully unpacked after last year’s fires. He and his neighbors wondered whether open space grassland to the north of them could be a barrier from the flames.

“It doesn’t matter because a spark can fly over from anywhere,” said Schwarz.

The Red Cross said more than 800 people stayed at shelters.



Click here to comment on this story »







Sections


Profile

Contact the Spokesman

Main switchboard:
(509) 459-5000
Customer service:
(800) 338-8801
Newsroom:
(509) 459-5400
(800) 789-0029
Back to Spokesman Mobile