June 19, 2013 in Idaho

Idaho works on prison reform

Effort to be funded by several grants
By The Spokesman-Review
 

BOISE – Idaho has some of the nation’s lowest crime rates, but its prison population is growing quickly at a time when most states are seeing declines.

In response, the three branches of state government in Idaho – the governor, the Supreme Court and the Legislature – are coming together to launch an intensive effort to find out what’s going wrong and fix it. The effort will be aided by the Pew Charitable Trusts, the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance and the Council of State Governments’ Justice Center.

The state qualified for more than $250,000 in grants for the effort, which Gov. Butch Otter unveiled Tuesday.

“Criminal justice is taking a larger and larger share of our state budget every year,” Otter said. Despite Idaho’s low crime rate, one of every 34 males is involved in the criminal justice system and one of every 156 females, he said. More than a third of those in Idaho’s prisons are repeat offenders.

“What are we not doing while we have them, to prepare them for a life outside of the correctional environment that they end up in?” Otter asked. “What more can we do?”

Other states, including Texas, Kansas and South Carolina, have worked on the “justice reinvestment” approach, which involves data analysis, developing policy options and measuring results.

Some states have seen impressive results. Texas estimated that it averted $340 million in operational costs and $1.5 billion in prison construction costs. South Carolina was expecting an increase of 3,000 prison inmates in 2010 and $300 million in increased costs; instead, its prison population dropped.


Thoughts and opinions on this story? Click here to comment >>

Get stories like this in a free daily email