June 19, 2013 in Business

Starbucks will soon post calorie counts

Associated Press
 
Focus on food

Starbucks wants coffee fans to think of it as a spot to grab lunch or a late afternoon bite – not just a place to get a cup of morning joe.

The Seattle-based coffee chain is looking to increase its sales in the U.S. by making its food a bigger attraction, particularly in the slower afternoon and evening hours.

In April, for example, Starbucks Corp. launched several new sandwiches and salads.

Troy Alstead, chief financial officer at Starbucks, said at the Jefferies Global Consumer Conference on Tuesday that food should account for a greater portion of sales as the company rolls out better pastries from its recently acquired La Boulange bakery, he said.

He said the company is working to get more regular customers to buy food along with their drinks.

NEW YORK – Starbucks has a new way to wake up its customers: showing the calories in its drinks.

The Seattle-based coffee chain says it will start posting calorie counts on menu boards nationwide next week, ahead of a federal regulation that would require it to do so.

Calorie counts on menus are already required in some parts of the country, including New York City.

But starting June 25, Starbucks Corp. says customers at its more than 11,000 U.S. locations will be able to see that there are 300 calories in a small caramel Frappuccino and 230 calories in a small Iced Caffe Mocha.

Pastry cases will also show calorie information, in case customers want to save some calories and opt for a Morning Bun (350 calories) instead of a blueberry scone (460 calories).

The move by Starbucks comes as the Food and Drug Administration irons out the details of a regulation that would require companies with more than 20 locations to post calorie information on their menus. Other chains including McDonald’s Corp. have also moved ahead with posting the information, saying they’re providing it to be more transparent rather than because they’re being forced to.

Starbucks notes that there are numerous ways people can reduce the calories in their drinks, such as by asking for non-fat milk, sugar-free syrup or no whipped cream.

© Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Get stories like this in a free daily email


Please keep it civil. Don't post comments that are obscene, defamatory, threatening, off-topic, an infringement of copyright or an invasion of privacy. Read our forum standards and community guidelines.

You must be logged in to post comments. Please log in here or click the comment box below for options.

comments powered by Disqus