June 29, 2013 in Nation/World

California plaintiffs for gay marriage wed

Appeals court skips wait time, lifts stay
Lisa Leff Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

California Attorney General Kamala Harris, left, reacts after conducting the wedding of Sandy Stier, center left, and Kris Perry at City Hall in San Francisco on Friday.
(Full-size photo)

SAN FRANCISCO – The four plaintiffs in the U.S. Supreme Court case that overturned California’s same-sex marriage ban tied the knot Friday, just hours after a federal appeals court freed gay couples to obtain marriage licenses in the state for the first time in 4 1/2 years.

Attorney General Kamala Harris presided at the San Francisco City Hall wedding of Kris Perry and Sandy Stier as hundreds of supporters looked on and cheered. The couple sued to overturn the state’s voter-approved gay marriage ban along with Paul Katami and Jeff Zarrillo, who married at Los Angeles City Hall 90 minutes later with Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa presiding.

“By joining the case against Proposition 8, they represented thousands of couples like themselves in their fight for marriage equality,” Harris said during Stier and Perry’s brief ceremony.

Harris declared Perry, 48, and Stier, 50, “spouses for life,” but during their vows, the Berkeley couple took each other as “lawfully wedded wife.” One of their twin sons served as ring-bearer.

Although the couples fought for the right to wed for years, their nuptials came together in a flurry when a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals issued a brief order Friday afternoon dissolving a stay it had imposed on gay marriages while the lawsuit challenging the ban advanced through the courts.

Sponsors of California’s same-sex marriage ban, known as Proposition 8, also were caught off-guard and complained that the San Francisco-based 9th Circuit’s swift action made it more difficult for them to ask the Supreme Court to reconsider its decision.

Under Supreme Court rules, the losing side has 25 days to ask the high court to rehear the case, and Proposition 8’s backers had not yet announced whether they would do so.

“The resumption of same-sex marriage this day has been obtained by illegitimate means. If our opponents rejoice in achieving their goal in a dishonorable fashion, they should be ashamed,” said Andy Pugno, general counsel for a coalition of religious groups that sponsored the 2008 ballot measure.

“It remains to be seen whether the fight can go on, but either way, it is a disgraceful day for California,” he said.

The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Wednesday that Proposition 8’s sponsors lacked standing in the case after Harris and Gov. Jerry Brown refused to defend the ban in court.

The decision lets stand a trial judge’s declaration that the ban violates the civil rights of gay Californians and cannot be enforced.

The Supreme Court said earlier this week that it would not finalize its ruling in the Proposition 8 case “at least” until after the 25-day period, which ends July 21.

The appeals court was widely expected to wait until the Supreme Court’s judgment was official. Ninth Circuit spokesman David Madden said Friday that the panel’s decision to act sooner was “unusual, but not unprecedented.”

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