March 9, 2013 in Sports

Iditarod fatigue: Seeing elephants in the snow

Associated Press
 

Buser
(Full-size photo)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska – There comes a time during the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race when fatigue can turn Alaska’s frozen landscape into an unlikely habitat for an elephant that really isn’t there.

Ask Lynda Plettner, a former participant in the 1,000-mile race. The Big Lake, Alaska, musher was so sleep-deprived once that she saw a large gray African elephant in the distance trudging in the snow toward a metal building that had no doors or windows. Both the elephant and the building got bigger as Plettner got closer and her weary brain focused on getting the dogs safely past them before it dawned on her that she was hallucinating.

“I concluded that that couldn’t possibly be there,” she said.

Participants in this year’s race are struggling with their own exhaustion in their journey toward the finish line in Nome on Alaska’s western coast. But they keep on mushing anyway.

Four-time Iditarod champion Martin Buser, of Big Lake, reclaimed the lead Friday afternoon that was taken earlier by Aliy Zirkle, last year’s runner-up. Zirkle, of Two Rivers, had been the first to reach the village of Grayling, a checkpoint on the Yukon River, which is the trail for 238 miles of the race, but Buser caught up and left before Zirkle.

Buser was first into the previous checkpoint at Anvik early Friday. But he decided to take a mandatory eight-hour break there, while Zirkle blew out of the village one minute after arriving.

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