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Seavey grabs 13-minute lead in Iditarod after 930 miles

Wed., March 13, 2013, midnight

Seavey
Seavey

NOME, Alaska – Thirteen minutes.

After mushing about 930 miles across the Alaska wilderness the last nine days, that’s all that separated the first two teams in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.

Mitch Seavey was the first musher into the checkpoint at White Mountain, 77 miles from the finish line in Nome. He checked in at 5:11 a.m. Tuesday, and Aliy Zirkle, last year’s runner-up, followed him at 5:24 a.m.

And now it’s a waiting game.

All mushers have to take an eight-hour mandatory rest at White Mountain, and then it will be a mad dash for the burled arch finish line in downtown Nome. The winner is expected sometime late Tuesday evening.

“They’re both great mushers, very talented, kind of that dog whisperer that I like to call some of those top mushers,” said race spokeswoman Erin McLarnon.

But at this point, it’s anybody’s guess who will cross the finish line first.

“Mitch doesn’t have a super solid lead. I mean, 13 minutes, anything can happen,” she said.

It’s likely Seavey, the 2004 champion and father of last year’s winner, Dallas Seavey, and Zirkle won’t be alone as they make the last run on the Bering Sea coast.

Four-time champion Jeff King is in third place, and checked into White Mountain at 6:52 a.m. He and Zirkle covered the last 46-mile section of trail, from Elim to White Mountain, a half hour faster than Mitch Seavey.

Seavey and Zirkle each have 10 dogs left on their team; King arrived at White Mountain with 11.

“Last year we saw a lot of those youngsters in the top 10,” McLarnon said. “Some of those 45-plussers are taking back the lead this year. They are showing the young ’uns what they can really do out there on that trail.”

The defending champion and youngest winner, Dallas Seavey, 26, arrived in White Mountain at 8:09 and Ray Redington Jr., a grandson of a race co-founder, was two minutes behind him.

The excitement for a mad dash down Front Street, a block off the frozen Bering Sea, that could parallel the 1978 photo finish between winner Dick Mackey and Rick Swenson has fans gathered in Nome excited to see the end of the race.

The winner will receive $50,400 and a new pickup.


 

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