May 2, 2013 in Nation/World

Jamestown scholars detail evidence of cannibalism

Earliest colonists faced brutal conditions in Virginia
Brett Zongker Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

Doug Owsley of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History displays the skull and facial reconstruction of “Jane of Jamestown” during a news conference at the museum in Washington, D.C.
(Full-size photo)

WASHINGTON – Scientists revealed Wednesday that they have found the first solid archaeological evidence that some of the earliest American colonists at Jamestown, Va., survived harsh conditions by turning to cannibalism.

For years, there have been tales of people in the first permanent English settlement in America eating dogs, cats, rats, mice, snakes and shoe leather to stave off starvation. There were also written accounts of settlers eating their own dead, but archaeologists had been skeptical of those stories.

But now, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and archaeologists from Jamestown are announcing the discovery of the bones of a 14-year-old girl that show clear signs that she was cannibalized. Evidence indicates clumsy chops to the body and head of the girl, who appears to have already been dead at the time.

Smithsonian forensic anthropologist Douglas Owsley said the human remains date back to a deadly winter known as the “starving time” in Jamestown from 1609 to 1610. Hundreds died during the period. Scientists have said the settlers likely arrived during the worst drought in 800 years, bringing severe food shortages for the 6,000 people who lived at Jamestown between 1607 and 1625.

The historical record is chilling. Early Jamestown colony leader George Percy wrote of a “world of miseries” that included digging up corpses from their graves to eat when there was nothing else. “Nothing was spared to maintain life,” he wrote.

Archaeologists at Jamestown and Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia were somewhat skeptical of the stories of cannibalism in the past because there was no solid proof, until now.

“Historians have questioned, well did it happen or not happen?” Owsley said. “And this is very convincing evidence that it did.”

Owsley has been working with William Kelso, the chief archaeologist at Jamestown, since their first burial discovery in 1996.

The remains of the 14-year-old girl, named “Jane” by researchers, were discovered in the summer of 2012 and mark the fourth set of human remains uncovered at Jamestown outside of graves. Her remains were found in a cellar at the site.

The discovery detracts from the happier mythology of Capt. John Smith and Pocahontas that many associate with Jamestown. The vice president of research at nearby Colonial Williamsburg, which oversees excavations of the original Jamestown site, said visitors will have a fuller view of a terrible time in early American history.

“I think we are better served by understanding history, warts and all, because I think it gives us a better understanding of who we are as a people,” James Horn said.

Owsley examined the girl’s remains and how the body had been dismembered, including chops to the front and back of the head. The girl was likely already dead at the time. There was a cultural stigma against killing someone for food.

But it was clear to Owsley immediately that there were signs of cannibalism.

“This does represent a clear case of dismemberment of the body and removing of tissues for consumption,” he said.

It was the work of someone not skilled at butchering, Owsley said, indicating a sense of desperation.

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