May 3, 2013 in City

In brief: CdA schools chief in line for job in Washington

 

Coeur d’Alene schools Superintendent Hazel Bauman is a finalist to lead a Western Washington school district, the Coeur d’Alene School District announced Thursday.

Bauman is one of three candidates who will be interviewed for interim superintendent at the Central Kitsap School District in Silverdale, Wash., according to the Kitsap Sun. That district’s current superintendent is leaving July 1.

Central Kitsap has about a dozen elementary schools as well as four alternative schools, three junior high schools and three high schools, according to its website.

Bauman said it is an opportunity to be closer to family members, a news release from the Coeur d’Alene district said. Bauman has been superintendent there since 2008.

Staff report

Paintball gun may have led to schools lockdown

Spokane County sheriff’s deputies believe a man working on his paintball gun triggered lockdowns at nine Spokane Valley schools Thursday morning.

A woman told deputies she saw a man carrying a gun and shooting it into the ground near 28th Avenue and Blake Street around 10:45 a.m., according to a Sheriff’s Office news release, but authorities could not locate a suspect.

Several Central Valley School District schools were locked down during the extensive search, the release said.

Later that day, a man called the Sheriff’s Office to say he was in the area and had taken a CO2 cartridge off his paintball gun – an action that makes a loud popping noise. He realized the woman likely heard this sound.

No shots were fired, deputies determined.

Nicole Hensley

Tax evasion brings two-year sentence

A Moses Lake man was sentenced Thursday to two years in federal prison after a jury convicted him last fall of failing to pay $939,258 in income taxes for three years.

J. Scott Vrieling, 50, didn’t pay taxes on $2.6 million worth of income he earned in 2004-07. In addition to the unpaid taxes, U.S. District Judge Robert Whaley also ordered Vrieling to pay about $115,000 in other fines and costs associated with the case.

Vrieling had been operating Vrieling Financial. As an independent insurance agent, Vrieling sold employee benefits, health insurance and other insurance products, Assistant U.S. Attorney Joseph Harrington wrote in a news release.

“Everyone must pay their fair share, and there are significant consequences for those who chose to cheat the system,” U.S. Attorney Mike Ormsby said in the release.

Thomas Clouse

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