May 7, 2013 in Nation/World

Assad chemical arms use ‘likely’

White House also backs Israeli strikes
Associated Press
 

WASHINGTON – The White House asserted Monday that it’s highly likely that Syrian President Bashar Assad’s regime, not the rebel opposition, was behind any chemical weapons use in Syria. Responding to weekend airstrikes in Syria, the White House also reiterated its view that Israel has the right to protect itself against weapons that could pose a threat to Israelis.

White House spokesman Jay Carney says there is evidence that chemical weapons have been used in Syria. And on Sunday, a member of a U.N. panel investigating events in Syria said there were indications that rebel forces had used the nerve agent sarin.

But Carney questioned that claim.

“We are highly skeptical of suggestions that the opposition could have or did use chemical weapons,” he said. “We find it highly likely that any chemical weapon use that has taken place in Syria was done by the Assad regime.”

Carney’s comments came as Syria remained one of the most high-profile issues confronting the administration. Airstrikes over the weekend on alleged Hezbollah-bound weapons in Syria and the status of chemical weapons use kept the country’s civil war at the forefront. Lebanon’s Hezbollah militia is an ally of Syria and foe of Israel.

The weekend airstrike on a military complex near the Syrian capital of Damascus killed at least 42 Syrian soldiers, a group of anti-regime activists said Monday, citing information from military hospitals.

The Israeli government has not formally confirmed that it carried out the air strikes Friday and Sunday, and Carney referred specific questions about the strikes to Israel.

“The transfer of sophisticated weapons to terrorist organizations like Hezbollah is certainly a concern and a threat to Israel, and they have the right to act in their own sovereign interest on … in response to those concerns,” Carney said.

Carney said the U.S. is still looking for conclusive evidence about chemical weapons use in Syria. Secretary of State John Kerry was leaving for Moscow on Monday to discuss the situation in Syria with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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