May 16, 2013 in Sports

Woods winning despite scrutiny

Doug Ferguson Ap
 
Associated Press photo

Tiger Woods needs four more wins to tie Sam Snead’s record for career tournament victories.
(Full-size photo)

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. – Tiger Woods has faced more scrutiny that any other golfer from his generation. Maybe ever.

Just not this variety.

Woods must long for the days when the golf world obsessed over his swing changes (all four of them) and questioned his coaches (all three of them). He was criticized for not playing enough tournaments and not giving the tournaments he did play enough notice that he was coming.

Some complained he practiced so early in the morning that paying customers didn’t get a chance to see him. Others complained he didn’t sign enough autographs. Most of it was petty.

But this is different.

Now it’s his integrity on the golf course that’s being questioned.

Woods won The Players Championship on Sunday for his fourth victory this year. Making it even more memorable, Woods ended his public spat with Sergio Garcia by posing with the crystal trophy. They were tied with two holes to play, and Garcia hit three shots in the water.

That all seems like B-material compared with the buzz over the drop Woods took on the 14th hole of the final round.

He hit what he called a “pop-up hook” with a 3-wood from the tee, and the ball landed in the water left of the fairway. Consulting with Casey Wittenberg, he dropped it some 255 yards short of the green. Woods then hit a remarkable shot short of the green, pitched on and missed a 6-foot putt to take double bogey.

The Internet has been alive with video showing the ball’s flight on the 14th, along with analysis dissecting what was and was not said by a TV analyst, and seemingly endless theories how the ball could possibly have crossed land where Woods took his drop.

The chatter won’t stop, even though there is nowhere to go with it. Consider this statement put out by Mark Russell, the tour’s vice president of competition: “Without definitive evidence, the point where Woods’ ball last crossed the lateral water hazard is determined through best judgment by Woods and his fellow competitor,” the statement said.

Woods conferred with Wittenberg, his playing partner.

“I saw it perfectly off the tee,” Wittenberg said. “I told him exactly where I thought it crossed, and we all agreed. So he’s definitely great on that.”

And if video suggests otherwise?

Decision 26-1/17 says a penalty would not be appropriate because it comes down to an honest judgment.

Of course, this might not be that big of an issue except that Woods in his most recent tournament – the Masters – was guilty of taking an illegal drop on the 15th hole at Augusta National. He eventually was docked two shots, but spared disqualification by the Masters because officials said they erred in not talking to Woods about the drop before he signed his scorecard. The rules back up that decision, though this one (Rule 33-7) is subject to interpretation. It could have gone either way.

That debate rages on. Should he have withdrawn for his own benefit? Did the Masters bail him out? Meanwhile, Adam Scott has a green jacket at his place in The Bahamas and he apparently wears it every morning. Good for him.

Back to Sawgrass, where there was that Saturday incident with Garcia which was one case where Woods shared some responsibility.

The scene on the par-5 second hole was chaotic. Woods was so deep in the trees that it appeared it was his turn to hit. Garcia stood over his second shot for the longest time. There was a burst of cheers when Woods pulled out his 5-wood. Garcia finished his swing and looked over at the crowd, clearly frustrated.

Woods and Garcia don’t like each other and haven’t for the better part of 13 years.

Garcia suggested in a TV interview that Woods pulled the club at just the right time to fire up the crowd and disrupt his swing. Woods said in a TV interview, “The marshals, they told me he already hit, so I pulled a club and was getting ready to play my shot.”

Lost in this mess is that Woods is playing golf at a very high level. He is four short of Sam Snead’s record for career wins. Woods is motoring along. But it’s a bumpy ride at the moment.

Get stories like this in a free daily email


Please keep it civil. Don't post comments that are obscene, defamatory, threatening, off-topic, an infringement of copyright or an invasion of privacy. Read our forum standards and community guidelines.

You must be logged in to post comments. Please log in here or click the comment box below for options.

comments powered by Disqus