May 20, 2013 in Nation/World

Volcano’s eruptions continue

Dan Joling Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

In this photo provided by the Alaskan Volcano Observatory, the Pavlof volcano erupts May 17, as seen from the air near Cold Bay, Alaska.
(Full-size photo)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska – Alaska’s Pavlof volcano sent ash and steam skyward Sunday but not enough to raise the aviation threat for international air carriers.

A satellite at 12:40 a.m. measured an ash cloud at 19,500 feet, just below the 20,000-foot threshold considered to be a major threat to transcontinental aircraft. The aviation warming level remained at code orange, a step below red, the highest of the four levels, said geologist Kristi Wallace of the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

Pavlof is an 8,262-foot volcano located 625 miles southwest of Anchorage on the Alaska Peninsula, the finger of land that sticks out from mainland Alaska toward the Aleutian Islands.

Residents of Sand Point, a city of nearly 1,000 on Popof Island about 55 miles east of the volcano, woke to find traces of ash on their vehicles.

Pavlof’s latest eruption began May 13 and sent hot mud flow down the sides of the mountain. Sand Point residents have recorded the eruption with photographs posted on the Alaska Volcano Observatory website, Wallace said.

© Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Get stories like this in a free daily email


Please keep it civil. Don't post comments that are obscene, defamatory, threatening, off-topic, an infringement of copyright or an invasion of privacy. Read our forum standards and community guidelines.

You must be logged in to post comments. Please log in here or click the comment box below for options.

comments powered by Disqus