Nation/World

Volcano’s eruptions continue

In this photo provided by the Alaskan Volcano Observatory, the Pavlof volcano erupts May 17, as seen from the air near Cold Bay, Alaska. (Associated Press)
In this photo provided by the Alaskan Volcano Observatory, the Pavlof volcano erupts May 17, as seen from the air near Cold Bay, Alaska. (Associated Press)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska – Alaska’s Pavlof volcano sent ash and steam skyward Sunday but not enough to raise the aviation threat for international air carriers.

A satellite at 12:40 a.m. measured an ash cloud at 19,500 feet, just below the 20,000-foot threshold considered to be a major threat to transcontinental aircraft. The aviation warming level remained at code orange, a step below red, the highest of the four levels, said geologist Kristi Wallace of the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

Pavlof is an 8,262-foot volcano located 625 miles southwest of Anchorage on the Alaska Peninsula, the finger of land that sticks out from mainland Alaska toward the Aleutian Islands.

Residents of Sand Point, a city of nearly 1,000 on Popof Island about 55 miles east of the volcano, woke to find traces of ash on their vehicles.

Pavlof’s latest eruption began May 13 and sent hot mud flow down the sides of the mountain. Sand Point residents have recorded the eruption with photographs posted on the Alaska Volcano Observatory website, Wallace said.



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