May 31, 2013 in City

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

By The Spokesman-Review
 

From our archives, 100 years ago

A fine new county infirmary was being built at Spangle, and the Spokane Daily Chronicle displayed a fine architectural drawing.

The building, designed by architect Archibald G. Rigg, was a sweeping brick-and-concrete structure, with a main building and two wings. The main building, which would be built immediately, would accommodate 200 residents; the other wings would be built as needed. 

The building would be segregated, with the women having a portion of the first and second floors. The building would also have a dispensary, linen rooms, storerooms, a surgery area, general reading rooms, separate sitting rooms for men and women, a staff dining room and cooling and refrigerating rooms.

The county commissioners aimed to have this building under construction within a month. It was connected with the extensive county poor farm complex at Spangle, and it was for tuberculosis patients and other patients who had become the responsibility of the county.

Also on this date

(From the Associated Press)

1859: Big Ben in London went into operation, chiming for the first time. … 1977: The trans-Alaska oil pipeline was completed. … 1994: The United States announced it was no longer aiming long-range nuclear missiles at targets in the former Soviet Union.

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