November 8, 2013 in Nation/World

Britain’s top spies denounce Snowden leaks

Henry Chu Los Angeles Times
 
Associated Press photo

The heads of Britain’s intelligence agencies face UK lawmakers in London on Thursday. From left are Andrew Parker, head of MI5, John Sawers, head of MI6, and Iain Lobban, director of GCHQ.
(Full-size photo)

LONDON – In an unprecedented public appearance, Britain’s three grayest men – the shadowy bosses of its spy services – asserted Thursday that their work upholds personal freedom rather than undermines it and that enemies such as al-Qaida were “rubbing their hands in glee” over the recent leaks about mass government surveillance of electronic communication.

“Al-Qaida is lapping it up,” declared the chief of Britain’s foreign intelligence agency, John Sawers, who is also known in official circles as “C” (like “M,” James Bond’s fictional superior in the same agency).

His colleague, Iain Lobban, said his staff was now seeing “near-daily discussion” by terrorist groups on how to avoid having their digital communications caught in the spying dragnet revealed by former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden.

Lobban, head of eavesdropping agency General Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ, told Parliament’s intelligence and security committee that Snowden’s disclosures had made his staff’s job “far, far harder.”

But pressed for specific examples of intelligence-gathering being compromised, Sawers and Lobban said they would provide such details only in a private session with lawmakers and not in the highly unusual televised hearing held Thursday.

It was the first glimpse most Britons have ever had of Lobban, a career spy, and of Andrew Parker, the director of MI5, Britain’s domestic intelligence agency, who also appeared before the parliamentary committee.

Sawers is only slightly less mysterious, having caused a stir three years ago by delivering a rare public address defending the covert operations conducted by his agency, the Secret Intelligence Service, or MI6.

The three spooks’ joint appearance followed an acknowledgment last month by lawmakers that a public debate on mass surveillance and civil liberties had become increasingly necessary in the digital age.

The three spy chiefs dismissed criticism that Britain’s intelligence services are inherently inimical to personal privacy and freedom.

“The suggestion that what we do is somehow compromising freedom and democracy – of course we believe the opposite to be the case,” Parker said. “The work we do is addressing directly threats to this country, to our way of life and to the people who live here.”

Parker said a “team effort” by the three agencies had foiled 34 terrorist plots since the July 2005 suicide bombings on London’s transport network, which killed 52 people.

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