Nation/World

Texas gun activists hold ‘Come and take it’ rally

Michael Devine, a member of the Texas State Militia, waits for the “Come and Take It San Antonio” rally to begin at the Alamo in San Antonio on Saturday. (Associated Press)
Michael Devine, a member of the Texas State Militia, waits for the “Come and Take It San Antonio” rally to begin at the Alamo in San Antonio on Saturday. (Associated Press)

Hundreds gather outside the Alamo

SAN ANTONIO – Several-hundred gun rights activists armed with rifles and shotguns rallied Saturday outside of the Alamo in a demonstration that broke a long-standing tradition of not staging such events at the enduring symbol of Texas independence.

The “Come and Take It San Antonio!” rally was intended to draw attention to a right Texans already have: to carry long arms publicly so long as they don’t do it in a menacing manner. Organizers thought it necessary to offer a reminder after several open-carry advocates were threatened with arrest at a Starbucks in the city two months ago. The problem remains that a local ordinance effectively limits the open carrying of firearms to police and security guards.

That ordinance was not enforced Saturday. San Antonio police Chief William McManus mingled in the crowd that police estimated at about 300 to 400, but the larger police presence remained around the perimeter of the Alamo plaza.

“There are too many issues associated with trying to enforce every ordinance here today,” McManus said.

Rally organizers said just holding their demonstration in front of police without incident was a victory.

“(The San Antonio Police Department) is no longer going to be messing with us,” said C.J. Grisham, president of Open Carry Texas, with the Alamo’s famed Spanish mission behind him.

Organizers had also hoped that seeing a large peaceful gathering of armed citizens in the downtown of the country’s seventh-largest city would be a step toward making people comfortable with the sight. There were people of all ages in the crowd, including young children. Some waved flags that read “Come and Take It,” others dressed in period costumes, but most looked like anyone else one might encounter on the street – they just happened to be carrying rifles.



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