September 9, 2013 in Nation/World

Syria rebels take ancient Christian village

Mitchell Prothero McClatchy-Tribune
 

BEIRUT – A coalition of Syrian rebel groups that includes members of al-Qaida took control of one of the oldest Christian villages in the world on Sunday, raising concern about the potential destruction of ancient shrines and churches.

Rebel commanders vowed to protect the inhabitants of Maaloula and the village’s holy sites, but there were worries that the town’s many churches, monasteries and shrines from Christianity’s earliest years could be damaged as the Syrian government attempts to regain control.

Maaloula is about 35 miles northeast of Damascus, in the mountains along the border with Lebanon. Its residents, who still speak Aramaic, the language Jesus is thought most likely to have spoken, are loyal to the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

Announcements of the town’s capture after five days of fighting were issued by the Nusra Front, a rebel group that has sworn allegiance to al-Qaida; another conservative Islamist rebel group, Ahrar al Sham; and the more mainstream Farouk Brigade.

Witnesses in the town told local media that the government forces withdrew from the center of the village of about 5,000 on Sunday morning but that the regime’s artillery and jets had begun to target rebel positions in the center of the town.

It was not immediately clear if the rebels had occupied sensitive religious sites in the village, which has little strategic value but could become a potent symbol if its historic sites fall victim to the violence.

Commanders from the Rebellion of Baba Amr, which is part of the Farouk Brigade, one of the largest rebel formations, could be seen on social media videos announcing the victory from Maaloula’s recognizable town square.

“We cleansed Maaloula from all the Assad dogs and all his thugs,” an unidentified Farouk commander said to his men in one video, with the shrine to St. Takla, one of Christianity’s oldest sites, in the background.

The Nusra Front released a statement of victory on a Facebook page associated with the group and a number of videos released online by Ahrar al Sham showed that group in several locations also within the village. Both groups follow strict conservative interpretations of Islam that forbid shrines to saints, and many Christians feared they would damage the sites or harass the residents of the ardently pro-Assad town.

A statement from the Syrian Military Council, the group through which the West funnels aid to more moderate rebel groups, vowed to protect both the sites and “religious minorities” residing in the village.

“We emphasize that we are working very hard to protect all minorities and have sent army units to protect the people of Maaloula and importantly, all of the monasteries and shrines,” the statement said.

But the military council doesn’t command either the Nusra Front or Ahrar al Sham, and both groups have fought with military council-affiliated groups before. Nusra and Ahrar al Sham generally are considered the anti-Assad movement’s most effective and aggressive rebel fighters, making it unclear that the military council will be able to enforce its pledge to protect the area.

Christians make up about 10 percent Syria’s population and have generally sided with the government against the rebels, who are overwhelmingly Sunni Muslims.


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