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Six killed as bus hits train in Canada

Emergency personnel look over the crash scene of a train and city bus collision in Ottawa’s west end Wednesday. Multiple people were killed when a city bus collided with a passenger train at a crossing at the peak of morning rush hour, police said. (Associated Press)
Emergency personnel look over the crash scene of a train and city bus collision in Ottawa’s west end Wednesday. Multiple people were killed when a city bus collided with a passenger train at a crossing at the peak of morning rush hour, police said. (Associated Press)

OTTAWA, Ontario – Passengers screamed “Stop! Stop!” seconds before their bus crashed through a crossing barrier and into a commuter train during morning rush hour in Canada’s capital on Wednesday, killing six people and injuring 34.

“He smoked the train,” witness Mark Cogan said of the bus driver, who was among those killed. “He went through the guardrail and just hammered the train, and then it was just mayhem.”

It was not immediately clear what caused the bus to smash through the lowered barrier at a crossing in suburban Ottawa.

The front of the double-decker bus was ripped away by the impact, and the train’s locomotive and one passenger car derailed, though there were no reports of major injuries to train passengers or crew.

Eight were still listed in critical condition late Wednesday. The crash brought trains on the national Via Rail’s Ottawa-Toronto route to a standstill.

It was Canada’s second major rail accident in less than three months. A runaway oil train derailed and exploded in a Quebec town on July 6, killing 47 people in the country’s worst rail disaster in more than a century.

Tanner Trepanier said he and other passengers could see the four-car train bearing down on them as the bus approached the crossing.


 

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