September 21, 2013 in Washington Voices

Immunization clinics offered free of charge

Childhood vaccinations will be administered
By The Spokesman-Review
 
Free vaccines

 Two Spokane County schools will offer free vaccinations for children and free whooping cough vaccinations for adults who are under- or uninsured.

• North Pines Middle School, 701 N. Pines Road, Tuesday from 5 to 7 p.m. Call Cheryl Sampson at (509) 228-5888.

• Sunset Elementary School Health Center, 12824 W. 12th Ave., Building C, Airway Heights, Oct. 3 from 5-7 p.m.

Three clinics will offer free pertussis vaccinations to under- or uninsured adults

• Group Health Riverfront Medical Center, 322 W. North River Drive, Sept. 28 from 9 a.m. to noon.

• Providence Urgent Care – Division, 421 S. Division St., Oct. 5 from 9 a.m. to noon.

• Providence Urgent Care – Hawthorne, 551 E. Hawthorne Road, Oct. 12 from 9 a.m. to noon.

For more information about the vaccines, call Spokane Regional Health Department’s Immunization Outreach Program at (509) 324-1442.

Parents whose children are in need of vaccinations are invited to North Pines Middle School on Tuesday for a free vaccination clinic.

Presented by the Central Valley School District and Spokane Regional Health District, vaccines will be administered through a grant from the Group Health Foundation.

The clinic will offer, “everything that kids can get from birth to age 19,” said Cheryl Sampson, school nurse specialist at Chester Elementary School.

While the state of Washington pays for children’s vaccinations, parents must usually pay an office fee to have someone administer the vaccine. The clinic at North Pines will be completely free.

Sampson said parents don’t have to bring any proof of income or residency, but it is helpful if they bring their child’s immunization records.

The North Pines clinic is open to anyone, and no appointment is needed. A second clinic will be at Sunset Elementary School in Airway Heights on Oct. 3.

Along with immunizing children, under- or uninsured adults can receive the vaccine for pertussis, also known as whooping cough.

“Whooping cough is a serious disease that can be fatal for infants and young children who usually catch it from parents, grandparents, older siblings and caregivers,” said Dr. Jane Dimer of Women’s Health and Maternity Child Clinical Services for Group Health. “Adults and teens often experience milder symptoms from whooping cough and are unaware they have it.”

Part of the “Silence Whooping Cough” campaign, there will be five clinics around the area in September and October to raise awareness and offer vaccinations.

“The beauty of it is they don’t have to pay an office fee,” said Kimberlee Papich, public information officer for SRHD.

This story has been updated; the time of the Oct. 3 clinic has been changed.

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