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In brief: Copper heiress suit reaches settlement

A tentative deal has been reached in a New York court fight over the will of an eccentric Montana copper mining heiress.

A person familiar with the case told the Associated Press on Saturday that Huguette Clark’s relatives have reached a tentative settlement with a hospital, a nurse and others over the distribution of her roughly $300 million estate.

Clark’s relatives will get about $34.5 million after taxes under the deal.

The person spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the settlement because it hasn’t yet been made public.

Several of the many lawyers involved with the case declined to comment or didn’t immediately return calls.

Clark owned lavish properties but opted to spend her last 20 years in a Manhattan hospital. She died in 2011 at age 104.

Men to get separate trials in 2010 death

A Moscow, Idaho, judge has ruled that Charles Capone and David Stone, both accused in the killing and disappearance of Rachael Anderson, of Clarkston, will be tried separately.

Capone, 52, and Stone, 50, both of Moscow, face several charges in Latah County for their alleged involvement in the death of Anderson, who was in the process of divorcing Capone when she went missing on April 16, 2010.

2nd District Judge Jeff Brudie denied the state’s request, filed by Latah County Prosecutor William Thompson Jr., to combine the trials of the two men. Capone’s attorney, Mark Monson, said he was pleased with the result.

Thompson said he will continue to prepare for both trials. Capone’s trial is set to begin at 9 a.m. Dec. 9 in front of 2nd District Judge Michael Griffin. A trial date has not yet been set for Stone.

Capone and Stone are both charged with first-degree murder, conspiracy to commit first-degree murder, failure to notify a coroner or law enforcement officer about a death and conspiracy to commit failure to notify a coroner or law enforcement officer about a death. Both men have pleaded not guilty to all charges.



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