Idaho


White House shooter from Idaho sentenced to 25 years

TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 2014

Law enforcement officers photograph a window at the White House in Washington in November 2011. A bullet had hit an exterior window of the White House and was stopped by ballistic glass, the Secret Service said at the time. (Associated Press)
Law enforcement officers photograph a window at the White House in Washington in November 2011. A bullet had hit an exterior window of the White House and was stopped by ballistic glass, the Secret Service said at the time. (Associated Press)

WASHINGTON – An Idaho man who pleaded guilty to firing an assault rifle at the White House in 2011, striking the executive mansion more than half a dozen times, was sentenced Monday to 25 years in prison.

Prosecutors initially charged Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez with attempting to assassinate President Barack Obama but agreed to drop the charge as part of a plea deal last year. Ortega-Hernandez instead pleaded guilty to two charges including damaging the home.

The president and first lady Michelle Obama were not home at the time of the shooting, and no one was injured. But prosecutors said Ortega-Hernandez, 23, jeopardized the lives of numerous others. That included two other members of the Obama family who were at the home as well as White House employees and staff, Secret Service agents, tourists and bystanders.

Prosecutors said the bullets from Ortega-Hernandez’s gun caused nearly $100,000 worth of damage to the home. They asked that Ortega-Hernandez spend 27 1/2 years in prison.

Ortega-Hernandez himself told the judge he was “deeply sorry” for putting people in danger when he drove by the White House on the night of Nov. 11, 2011, and shot at the home from his car. He said that he “never meant to hurt anybody.”

“I’m not a bad person. I made a huge mistake,” he said before pleading for a 10-year sentence.

Ortega-Hernandez’s lawyers argued that he was suffering from extreme depression and mental stress at the time of the shooting and was under the misguided belief that the end of the world was coming. Ortega-Hernandez’s lawyers said his motivation in firing a gun at the White House was to “call attention to what he believed was the coming apocalypse.”

They said in written filings with the court that he rejected shooting at locations in Idaho Falls, where he is from, as well as at the Grand Canyon and Statue of Liberty, because he didn’t think they would attract enough attention.


 

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