April 25, 2014 in Nation/World

FDA takes first run at regulating e-cigarettes

Michael Felberbaum Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

Daryl Cura demonstrates an e-cigarette at Vape store in Chicago on Wednesday.
(Full-size photo)

What’s proposed

In addition to mandating warning labels that say nicotine is an addictive chemical, the rules would require e-cigarette makers to disclose their products’ ingredients. They would not be allowed to claim their products are safer than other tobacco products.

In addition, they couldn’t give out free samples or sell e-cigarettes in vending machines unless they are in a place open only to adults, such as a bar.

The public and the industry will have 75 days to comment on the proposed rules. There is no timetable for when the FDA will issue its final rules.

WASHINGTON – The federal government’s move to regulate e-cigarettes is a leap into the unknown.

Most everyone agrees a ban on selling them to kids would be a step forward. But health and public policy experts can’t say for certain whether the electronic devices are a good thing or a bad thing overall, whether they help smokers kick the habit or are a gateway to ordinary paper-and-tobacco cigarettes.

The proposed rules, issued Thursday by the Food and Drug Administration, tread fairly lightly. They would ban sales to anyone under 18, add warning labels and require FDA approval for new products.

Some public health experts say a measured approach is the right one. They think that the devices, which heat a nicotine solution to produce an odorless vapor without the smoke and tar of burning tobacco, can help smokers quit.

“This could be the single biggest opportunity that’s come along in a century to make the cigarette obsolete,” said David Abrams, executive director of the Schroeder Institute for Tobacco Research and Policy Studies at the American Legacy Foundation.

Still, some wonder whether e-cigarettes keep smokers addicted or hook new users and encourage them to move on to tobacco. And some warn that the FDA regulations could have unintended consequences.

“If the regulations are too heavy-handed, they’ll have the deadly effect of preventing smokers from quitting by switching to these dramatically less harmful alternatives,” said Jeff Stier, senior fellow at the National Center for Public Policy Research, a conservative think tank in Washington.

Scientists haven’t finished much research on e-cigarettes, and the studies that have been done have been inconclusive. The government is pouring millions into research to supplement independent and company studies.

The FDA has left the door open to further regulations, such as a ban on TV advertising and fruit- or candy-flavored e-cigarettes – measures that anti-smoking groups are demanding.

“It is inexcusable that it has taken the FDA and the administration so long to act. This delay has had serious public health consequences as these unregulated tobacco products have been marketed using tactics and sweet flavors that appeal to kids,” the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids said in a statement.

Electronic cigarettes are becoming a big business. Sales are estimated to have reached nearly $2 billion in 2013. Tobacco companies have noticed and have jumped into the business, too.

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