February 27, 2014 in City

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

By The Spokesman-Review
 

From our archives, 100 years ago

The jury in the Mitch Nance murder trial failed to reach a verdict, and the prosecutor said he would immediately ask for a new trial.

He said “there is every reason to insist” that Nance be retried for first-degree murder.

However, the jury clearly had its doubts about the case. Jurors said that on the first ballot, five jurors voted for acquittal, four for manslaughter and three for first-degree murder.

By the time the jury took its final ballot, a day later, the vote had changed to nine for acquittal, one for manslaughter and two for first-degree murder.

Mitch Nance shook hands with all of the jurors and thanked them for the attention they gave the case. His wife, May, “sat weeping,” with her baby in her arms.

From the tattoo file: Local Navy recruiters said that Jack McDonald, of Wallace, was the most tattooed recruit they had ever experienced.

McDonald was a “human art gallery.” His right shoulder had a Chinese head design, his forearm had a pair of clasped hands, his other forearm had a stiletto, and his upper arms had a U.S. flag, a dove, and a pair of hearts marked “U and I.” Even his thumbs were tattooed with stars.

McDonald explained that he had previously worked on steamship lines on the Great Lakes.


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