July 16, 2014 in Sports

Rose could play role

Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

Pete Rose was allowed to participate on the 25th anniversary of his record-setting 4,192nd hit.
(Full-size photo)

Tuesday’s number

$287,500: Amount paid at auction in Minneapolis for an autographed baseball glove that Lou Gehrig gave to a Connecticut man when he was a boy. Howard Henderson, a 92-year-old Greenwich resident, says the New York Yankees slugger gave him the glove in the mid-1930s. Gehrig and his wife were friends of Henderson’s father, Ray, a songwriter. The buyer was not disclosed.

Pete Rose may have a role to play in next year’s All-Star game in Cincinnati despite his lifetime ban from baseball.

The career hits leader generally is not allowed in any areas of major league ballparks not open to fans. But the former Reds star was allowed to participate in baseball’s All-Century team ceremony at Atlanta’s Turner Field during the 1999 World Series and was permitted to be on the field at Great American Ballpark in 2010 for a ceremony commemorating the 25th anniversary of his record-setting 4,192nd hit.

He also was on the field in Cincinnati last September for the unveiling of a bronze sculpture honoring Hall of Fame teammate Joe Morgan.

The Reds host the 2015 All-Star game on July 14, and Commissioner Bud Selig left open the possibility Rose could play a part.

“That will be up to the Cincinnati club, and they know what they can do and can’t do,” Selig told the Baseball Writers’ Association of America on Tuesday. “It’s sort of been subjective. But they’ve done some things with Pete, but they’ve been very, very thoughtful and limited. But that’s a subject that I’m sure they’ll discuss in the next year.”

Rose agreed to the lifetime ban in August 1989 following an investigation by Major League Baseball that concluded he bet on the Reds to win while managing the team.

Rose applied for reinstatement in September 1997 and met with Selig in November 2002.

Clearing the bases

MLB has appointed former outfielder Billy Bean, who came out as gay after his playing career, to serve as a consultant in guiding the sport toward greater inclusion and equality. Joining Bean and Commissioner Bud Selig at a news conference was Lutha Burke, the sister of Glenn Burke, who was the first MLB player to reveal his homosexuality after retiring. Burke died in 1995. … MLB players say they may consider whether to discuss a possible ban on chewing tobacco when they negotiate their next labor contract in two years. For now, they hope individuals decide on their own to stop dipping. … Athletics owner Lew Wolff is willing to re-examine whether it would make sense to build a new ballpark at the site of Oakland Coliseum.

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