July 22, 2014 in Nation/World

In brief: Senator’s health care lawsuit dismissed

From Wire Reports
 

MILWAUKEE – A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit that Wisconsin Republican Sen. Ron Johnson filed to stop members of Congress and their employees from getting subsidized health insurance through small business exchanges.

U.S. District Judge William Griesbach ruled Monday that Johnson and a staff member who filed the lawsuit with him don’t have grounds to bring the suit.

Johnson filed the lawsuit after the Office of Personnel Management decided lawmakers and their staffs should continue to receive health care benefits covering about 75 percent of their premium costs after leaving the federal insurance program.

Johnson said the decision would make him decide which staff members must buy insurance through an exchange, potentially creating conflict in his office. He also said it forced him to participate in a program that he believed was illegal.

Police: Teen told of many other attacks

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – Three teenagers accused of fatally beating two homeless men beyond recognition with cinder blocks, bricks and a metal fence pole may have been terrorizing transients around Albuquerque for months, police said Monday.

A man who identified himself as the father of two of the boys said they were once homeless themselves and he had no idea what prompted the beatings. One of the boys told police they had attacked about 50 homeless people over the last few months, but had never gone that far. But on Friday night, he was angry about breaking up with his girlfriend, he said.

Alex Rios, 18, and two boys ages 16 and 15 face murder charges stemming from the brutal attack in an Albuquerque lot where neighbors say transients regularly camped at night.

Hospital to pay $190M for pictures

BALTIMORE – A “rogue” gynecologist who used tiny cameras to secretly record videos and photos of his patients has forced one of the world’s top medical centers to pay $190 million to 8,000 women and girls.

Dr. Nikita Levy was fired after 25 years with the Johns Hopkins Health System in Baltimore in February 2013 after a female co-worker spotted the pen-like camera he wore around his neck and alerted authorities.

Levy committed suicide days later, as a federal investigation led to roughly 1,200 videos and 140 images on computers in his home.

The settlement is one of the largest on record in the U.S. involving sexual misconduct by a physician.


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