June 29, 2014 in Nation/World

In brief: Store security gate falls on girl, who dies

From Wire Reports
 

Philadelphia – A metal security gate detached from the facade of an Italian ice shop Saturday afternoon, killing a 3-year-old girl, police said.

The security door fell on the child at a Rita’s Water Ice store in north Philadelphia at around 4:30 p.m., according to the Philadelphia Police Department. The girl was taken to Hahnemann University Hospital and died after arrival.

“Our hearts and prayers go out to the child’s family,” said Linda Duke, a spokeswoman for Rita’s Italian Ice, the shop’s parent company. “Due to the current investigation we really cannot comment about the unfortunate incident.”

Photos from the scene show the black metal gate lying on the sidewalk, pink balloons still tied to it in front of the shop’s red and white striped awning. Several popped balloons appear trapped underneath the gate, which businesses typically roll down after hours to prevent crime.

The child was there with her mother, according to WPVI-TV, and bystanders rushed to her aid while others gave CPR.

Alison Brady, who lives across the street and saw the gate fall, told the Philadelphia Inquirer that stucco work had recently been done on the shop.

“It was almost like slow motion,” she told the newspaper. “The gate was falling and people were screaming and it hit the ground and the little girl was there.”

In California: Bitcoins OK, food gloves off

Sacramento, Calif. – California Gov. Jerry Brown has signed bills that recognize the legal use of bitcoins and other digital currencies in California, repeal a requirement for food handlers to use gloves, and keep minor truants out of lockup facilities, his aides announced Saturday.

In all, the governor signed 15 pieces of legislation into law.

AB 129 will allow bitcoins and other digital currency to be legally used in transactions in California by repealing a provision of state law that bars the use of “anything but the lawful money of the United States.”

Streaming service Aereo in pause mode

New York – Online-streaming service Aereo Inc. is temporarily closing down its operation, three days after it was dealt an unfavorable ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.

“We have decided to pause our operations temporarily as we consult with the court and map out our next steps,” Aereo’s Chief Executive Officer Chet Kanojia wrote in a letter to customers posted on its website Saturday.

The Supreme Court dealt Aereo a major setback on Wednesday in ruling that the television-over-the-Internet service operates much like a cable TV company. As a result, the service violates copyright law unless Aereo pays broadcasters licensing fees for offering TV stations to customers’ tablets, phones and other gadgets.

But although the Supreme Court expressed its thinking on the law, it’s the U.S. District Court in New York that must issue a preliminary injunction stopping the service, as requested by broadcasters.

Winds abate, aiding Arizona wildfire fight

Vernon, Ariz. – A wildfire that has charred nearly 8 square miles in eastern Arizona’s White Mountains held steady Saturday, though the human-caused blaze has not been brought under control, officials said.

The fire has not grown and crews have made headway with burnout operations and retardant drops as winds that have whipped the flames in recent days slowed, Bill Morse, spokesman for the Southwest Area Incident Management Team, said Saturday evening.

Communities mostly populated with summer homes remained under mandatory evacuation orders because of the fire about 135 miles east of Phoenix, near the New Mexico line, which was reported around noon Thursday. There have been no reported injuries, and no new evacuations or notices to be ready to flee have been issued.

Woman didn’t get flexible commute, sues

Camden, N.J. – A New Jersey woman is suing her former employer for not letting her avoid commuting during rush hour, which she claims aggravated her anxiety and depression.

Andrea DeGerolamo said her employer, Fulton Financial Corp. of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, was legally required to accommodate her doctor-backed request for different work hours.

Her lawsuit accuses Fulton Financial of violating New Jersey’s anti-discrimination law and the federal Family Medical Leave Act.

The lawsuit was moved from state to federal court in June at the company’s request.


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