Arrow-right Camera
News >  Nation/World

Dallas buries three police officers slain at protest

Magnus Ahrens, 8, sits on the front seat of the caisson carriage carrying his father, Dallas police Sr. Cpl. Lorne Ahrens, at Restland Funeral Home and Cemetery on Wednesday, July 13, 2016, in Dallas. Ahrens was one of five police officers killed during protest in Dallas on July 7. (Tony Gutierrez / Associated Press)
Magnus Ahrens, 8, sits on the front seat of the caisson carriage carrying his father, Dallas police Sr. Cpl. Lorne Ahrens, at Restland Funeral Home and Cemetery on Wednesday, July 13, 2016, in Dallas. Ahrens was one of five police officers killed during protest in Dallas on July 7. (Tony Gutierrez / Associated Press)

DALLAS – After the shock and amid the grieving, Dallas paused Wednesday to bury its own.

Three of the five officers killed in last week’s downtown shooting were remembered during a day of mourning that drew friends, colleagues, family members and police officers from across the country.

The back-to-back-to-back services stretched schedules throughout the city.

The mayor planned to attend two; the Dallas police chief said he was going to all of them.

The police choir was torn. Family of Dallas Area Rapid Transit police Officer Brent Thompson, 34, requested it perform at 10 a.m. But the service for Dallas police Senior Cpl. Lorne Ahrens was at 11 a.m., half an hour away. Ahrens’ family said they understood, and the choir hoped to make it to the cemetery to see him laid to rest.

The police force was also short-staffed. There was a private funeral for Sgt. Michael Smith, 55, at 10 a.m., with a public service at noon Thursday. Services for Officer Michael Krol, 40, were set for Friday; Officer Patrick Zamarripa, 32, for Saturday. So many police were attending the simultaneous funerals, stations around the city had to cover one another’s shifts.

Officers streamed into the stadium-size Prestonwood Baptist Church in the suburb of Plano in dress uniforms with patches from Chicago, New York, Seattle and Los Angeles.

Ahrens, 48, was killed Thursday while patrolling a protest march, an attack that killed five officers and wounded nine and rattled the nation.

A Los Angeles native, Ahrens had worked as a Los Angeles County sheriff’s dispatcher, and 28 of his old co-workers attended the funeral, most in uniform.

Los Angeles sheriff’s Detective Sgt. Ed O’Neil, who played football with Ahrens on the Southern California Blue Knights, wore his old jersey to the funeral and brought a helmet that he placed near Ahrens’ open casket.

That’s when he noticed Ahrens wasn’t wearing his police uniform. His old friend had wanted to be buried barefoot in a T-shirt and shorts. Fitting, O’Neil thought.

As he approached to pay his respects – near where Ahrens’ wife and two children, ages 8 and 10, sat – he said he also thought, “I don’t know if I can do this.”

He and the others were tearing up. But then he thought of Ahrens, how, “in our group, if it would have happened to any of us, he would have done anything to say goodbye.”

As the crowd grew to about 5,000 people, most in uniform, Ahrens’ pastor rose to make a request.

“I’m going to ask you to take off your badges, to take off your stripes, to take off your position,” he said. “Allow yourself for a little while to be human, to be a person, to be a husband, to be a wife, to be a mother, to be a father. And to allow yourself to feel.

“No chain of command,“ he added, “no higher authority, just flesh-and-blood human beings.”

And so they did.

Ahrens’ casket left the church accompanied by a procession, scores of police cars and motorcycles that all but shut down the route.

Inside one of the cars was Ron Pinkston, president of the Dallas Police Association. He gazed out to see bystanders gathered at the roadsides and overpasses.

“It was heartwarming,” he said. “… Seeing people saluting, hands over their hearts, all races.”

Ahead of the procession, the police choir arrived at the cemetery from Officer Thompson’s funeral. It sang “I’ll Fly Away.“

“It’s exhausting,” Senior Cpl. John Hepworth, the acting choir director, said of the multiple funerals.


Subscribe to the Morning Review newsletter

Get the day's top headlines delivered to your inbox every morning by subscribing to our newsletter

There was a problem subscribing you to the newsletter. Double check your email and try again, or email webteam@spokesman.com

You have been successfully subscribed!


Top stories in Nation/World

Kim Jong Un agrees to dismantle main nuke site if U.S. takes steps too

UPDATED: 11:15 p.m.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un announced a sweeping set of agreements after their second day of talks in Pyongyang on Wednesday that included a promise by Kim to permanently dismantle the North’s main nuclear complex if the United States takes corresponding measures, the acceptance of international inspectors to monitor the closing of a key missile test site and launch pad and a vow to work together to host the Summer Olympics in 2032.