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Spokane Valley’s city hall on track for August completion

Spokane Valley city leaders in hardhats, from left, Bill Gothmann, Mayor Rob Higgins, Ed Pace, Arne Woodard and Sam Wood turn dirt to ceremonially break ground for the new Spokane Valley City Hall near the corner of Sprague and Dartmouth on the old U-City Mall site Thursday, June 9, 2016. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)
Spokane Valley city leaders in hardhats, from left, Bill Gothmann, Mayor Rob Higgins, Ed Pace, Arne Woodard and Sam Wood turn dirt to ceremonially break ground for the new Spokane Valley City Hall near the corner of Sprague and Dartmouth on the old U-City Mall site Thursday, June 9, 2016. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)

Spokane Valley Public Works Director Eric Guth gave a brief city hall construction update to the City Council on Tuesday evening.

The project is on track and should be completed by August.

Guth said the south wing of the building is going up a bit faster than the north wing, because the contractor is waiting for some materials to be delivered.

Guth explained that the biggest change to the project so far is moving the main water connection to Dartmouth Road instead of taking it in from Sprague Avenue. Guth said as designed, the water line was too close to underground conduits and that’s why it had to be moved.

The building is 27 percent completed. For more information on the project and to watch a time lapse recording from the site visit www.spokanevalley.org/CityHall.

Proposal targets utilities using city property

Spokane Valley is trying to negotiate new agreement with Water District 3, which has a pump house and well located in Browns Park and has provided water for the park instead of paying rent.

It was recently discovered that the water district’s lease has expired, and now the city and the district is trying to reach a new agreement.

Water District 3 pushed for an easement instead of a lease, saying that’s the only way the district can be guaranteed permanent access to its pump house and well.

The city countered with a 35-year lease, with an additional 15 years during which Water District 3 would have the right of first refusal if the city decided to sell the land for other than park use.

At Tuesday’s Spokane Valley City Council meeting, City Attorney Cary Driskell presented an ordinance that, if passed, could put more pressure on Water District 3 because it would require the district to remove its facilities – such as underground pipes and the pump house – if the utility company stops operating in the park.

The proposed ordinance, which got council consensus for a first reading, would apply to all utility companies that operate on city property.


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