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Sunday, December 16, 2018  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Debate Round III: Where the candidates stand on their fitness to be president

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump shakes hands with Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton following the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016. (Patrick Semansky / AP)
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump shakes hands with Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton following the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016. (Patrick Semansky / AP)

Six topics were chosen by moderator Chris Wallace for the third and final presidential debate. The 90-minute event will be divided into six 15-minute segments, with both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump speaking on the topics. Here’s where the two candidates stand on their fitness to be president, based on their previous statements.

Fitness to be president

Clinton: Questions about honesty, secrecy and inside dealing have dogged Clinton for years. How she handled the terrorist attacks in Benghazi, having a private server for her communications while Secretary of State and questions about her connections to Wall Street insiders have forced her to dodge accusations and innuendo thrown at her from her political opponents. While she has skillfully avoided directly answering some of those questions and parsed answers on others, those who oppose Clinton point to her past actions as proof of why she is not trustworthy and not fit to be president.

Trump: From what many consider discriminatory statements about race, religion and gender, Trump has been a whirlwind of controversy throughout the political campaign. His attacks on Muslims and people of Mexican heritage and his criticism of some people in black communities have raised questions about his willingness to be an inclusive leader. Most recently, statements he has made about women and comments that he has made that are considered to be sexual assault have hurt him in the polls and have kept him on the political defensive. His failure to turn over his tax returns and the past bankruptcy filings of several of his business interests have also raised questions about his fitness to be president.


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